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Cross-sectional associations of leisure and transport related physical activity with depression and anxiety

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Felipe B Schuch, André O Werneck, Davy Vancampfort, Brendon Stubbs, Megan Teychene, Paulo A Lotufo, Isabela Benseñor, André R Brunoni

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)228-234
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of psychiatric research
Volume140
Early online date4 Jun 2021
DOIs
E-pub ahead of print4 Jun 2021
PublishedAug 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: The ELSA-Brasil study was supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and CNPq (grants 01060010.00RS, 01060212.00BA, 01060300.00ES, 01060278.00MG, 01060115.00SP, 01060071.00RJ). Andr? Brunoni receives a ?Returning fellowship? from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and a research productivity grant from CNPQ (1B). Andr? Werneck is supported by the S?o Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) with a PhD scholarship (FAPESP process: 2019/24124?7). Brendon Stubbs is supported by a Clinical Lectureship (ICA-CL-2017-03-001) jointly funded by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). Brendon Stubbs is part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Brendon Stubbs also holds active grants with the Medical Research Council (GCRF and multimorbidity calls) and Guys and St Thomas Charity (GSTT). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the (partner organisation), the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health and Social Care, the MRC or GSTT. This study was financed in part by the Coordena??o de Aperfei?oamento de Pessoal de N?vel Superior - Brasil (CAPES) - Finance Code 001. Megan Teychenne is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Emerging Leadership Fellowship (APP1195335). Funding Information: The ELSA-Brasil study was supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Health and CNPq (grants 01060010.00RS , 01060212.00BA , 01060300.00ES , 01060278.00MG , 01060115.00SP , 01060071.00RJ ). André Brunoni receives a “Returning fellowship” from Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and a research productivity grant from CNPQ (1B). André Werneck is supported by the São Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP) with a PhD scholarship (FAPESP process: 2019/24124–7 ). Brendon Stubbs is supported by a Clinical Lectureship ( ICA-CL-2017-03-001 ) jointly funded by Health Education England (HEE) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) . Brendon Stubbs is part funded by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre at South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust . Brendon Stubbs also holds active grants with the Medical Research Council (GCRF and multimorbidity calls) and Guys and St Thomas Charity (GSTT). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the (partner organisation), the NHS, the NIHR, the Department of Health and Social Care, the MRC or GSTT. This study was financed in part by the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior - Brasil (CAPES) - Finance Code 001 . Megan Teychenne is supported by a National Health and Medical Research Council Emerging Leadership Fellowship ( APP1195335 ). Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: Previous evidence supports the notion that the physical activity (PA) domain (leisure-time or transport), and the amount of time spent in PA, influence the association of PA with depressive and anxiety symptoms. However, no study evaluated the associations of different volumes of leisure-time PA (LTPA) and transport PA (TPA) with prevalent depression, anxiety, and co-occurring depression and anxiety (D&A) disorders. Aim: To investigate the associations between different volumes of LTPA and TPA with prevalent depression, anxiety, and D&A. Methods: Cross-sectional study using baseline data of the ELSA-Brasil cohort. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) long-form was used to assess PA levels in each domain. The Clinical Interview Scheduled Revised (CIS-R) was used to diagnose prevalent depressive, anxiety, and D&A disorders. Logistic regressions, adjusting for confounding factors, were employed. Results are expressed as adjusted odds ratios (aOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: A total of 14,381 adults (54.5% female, 67.5% aged 45–64 years) were assessed. T ime spent in LTPA was associated with a lower prevalence of depression in low, and high volumes (60–89min/week aOR = 0.47, 95%CI = 0.29-0.76, p = 0.002, >300min/week aOR = 0.43, 95%CI = 0.31-0.59, p < 0.001). High volumes of LTPA were associated with a lower prevalence D&A (270–299min/week aOR = 0.55, 95%CI 0.38-0.79, p = 0.001; >300 minutes aOR = 0.63, 95%CI 0.54-0.74, p < 0.001). Low (60–89min/week aOR = 0.56, 95%CI = 0.40-0.79, p = 0.001) volumes of TPA were associated with lower prevalence of depression. Limitations: Cross-sectional design and self-reported PA. Lack of assessment of sedentary behaviour or occupational PA. Conclusions: The present study highlights the importance of contextual factors in the association between PA and mental health, particularly at higher levels.

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