D2/D3 dopamine supports the precision of mental state inferences and self-relevance of joint social outcomes

J. M. Barnby*, V. Bell, Q. Deeley, M. Mehta, M. Moutoussis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Striatal dopamine is important to paranoid attributions, although its computational role in social inference remains elusive. We employed a simple game theoretic paradigm and computational model of intentional attributions to investigate the effects of dopamine D2/D3 antagonism on ongoing mental state inference following social outcomes. Haloperidol, compared to placebo, enhanced the impact of partner behaviour on beliefs about harmful intent, and increased learning from recent encounters. These alterations caused significant changes to model covariation and negative correlations between self-interest and harmful intent attributions. Our findings suggest haloperidol improves flexibility in model-based beliefs about others and simultaneously reduces the self-relevance of social observations. Our results may reflect the role of D2/D3 dopamine in supporting self-relevant mentalisation. Our data and model bridge theory between general and social accounts of value representation. We demonstrate initial evidence for the sensitivity of our model and
short social paradigm to drug intervention and clinical dimensions, allowing
distinctions between mechanisms that operate across traits and states.
Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Mental Health
Publication statusSubmitted - 31 May 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'D2/D3 dopamine supports the precision of mental state inferences and self-relevance of joint social outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this