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Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system

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Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system. / Morris, Robin G.

In: Cognitive Neuropsychology, Vol. 1, No. 2, 1984, p. 143-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Morris, RG 1984, 'Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system', Cognitive Neuropsychology, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 143-157. https://doi.org/10.1080/02643298408252019

APA

Morris, R. G. (1984). Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system. Cognitive Neuropsychology, 1(2), 143-157. https://doi.org/10.1080/02643298408252019

Vancouver

Morris RG. Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system. Cognitive Neuropsychology. 1984;1(2):143-157. https://doi.org/10.1080/02643298408252019

Author

Morris, Robin G. / Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system. In: Cognitive Neuropsychology. 1984 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 143-157.

Bibtex Download

@article{fcc87aa86a624658a09c947a7c3ce202,
title = "Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system",
abstract = "This study explored the functioning of the articulatory loop system in patients at the early stages of Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type. The results showed that, in comparison to controls, memory span is clearly impaired, but the effect of phonemic confusability on immediate memory span is relatively normal and the effect of word length on span is also normal. Both effects are abolished by concurrent articulation if the stimulus material is presented visually. With auditory presentation only the word-length effect is abolished. Taken together, these results indicate that, despite overall cognitive impairment and reduced memory span, the articulatory loop system is relatively unimpaired by mild dementia.",
author = "Morris, {Robin G.}",
year = "1984",
doi = "10.1080/02643298408252019",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "143--157",
journal = "Cognitive Neuropsychology",
issn = "0264-3294",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dementia and the functioning of the articulatory loop system

AU - Morris, Robin G.

PY - 1984

Y1 - 1984

N2 - This study explored the functioning of the articulatory loop system in patients at the early stages of Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type. The results showed that, in comparison to controls, memory span is clearly impaired, but the effect of phonemic confusability on immediate memory span is relatively normal and the effect of word length on span is also normal. Both effects are abolished by concurrent articulation if the stimulus material is presented visually. With auditory presentation only the word-length effect is abolished. Taken together, these results indicate that, despite overall cognitive impairment and reduced memory span, the articulatory loop system is relatively unimpaired by mild dementia.

AB - This study explored the functioning of the articulatory loop system in patients at the early stages of Senile Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type. The results showed that, in comparison to controls, memory span is clearly impaired, but the effect of phonemic confusability on immediate memory span is relatively normal and the effect of word length on span is also normal. Both effects are abolished by concurrent articulation if the stimulus material is presented visually. With auditory presentation only the word-length effect is abolished. Taken together, these results indicate that, despite overall cognitive impairment and reduced memory span, the articulatory loop system is relatively unimpaired by mild dementia.

U2 - 10.1080/02643298408252019

DO - 10.1080/02643298408252019

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 143

EP - 157

JO - Cognitive Neuropsychology

JF - Cognitive Neuropsychology

SN - 0264-3294

IS - 2

ER -

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