Dental anomalies in first-degree relatives of transposed canine probands

Adriana Bartolo, Neville Calleja, Fraser McDonald, Simon Camilleri*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the inheritance pattern and prevalence of inheritable dental anomalies in a sample of patients with maxillary canine - first premolar transposition and their first-degree relatives with a sample of palatally displaced canine families. Thirty-five consecutive maxillary canine - first premolar transposition probands and 111 first-degree relatives were matched to 35 consecutive palatally displaced canine probands and 115 first-degree relatives. These were assessed for palatally displaced canines and incisor-premolar hypodontia. Parental age at birth of the proband was also noted. The results revealed that (i) there is no difference in the overall prevalence of palatally displaced canine or incisor-premolar hypodontia between the groups of relatives; (ii) first-degree relatives of bilateral palatally displaced canine probands have a higher prevalence of palatally displaced canine and incisor-premolar hypodontia than those with unilateral palatally displaced canine; and (iii) maternal age at birth of the maxillary canine - first premolar transposition probands was significantly higher than that of the palatally displaced canine probands. The results suggest that maxillary canine - first premolar transposition and palatally displaced canine are unlikely to be different genetic entities and also indicate environmental or epigenetic influences on dental development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-173
Number of pages5
JournalInternational Journal of Oral Science
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Ectopic
  • Epigenomics
  • Genetics
  • Hypodontia
  • Orthodontics
  • Tooth eruption

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