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Developing a better biopsychosocial understanding of pain in inflammatory bowel disease: a cross-sectional study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)335-344
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume32
Issue number3
Early online date31 Mar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2020

King's Authors

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Pain is frequently reported by patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Pain in IBD is not fully explained by disease activity or other clinical findings, and a recent systematic review suggested that psychosocial factors have an important role in IBD-pain. The aim of this study was to investigate psychosocial factors associated with pain in IBD. METHODS: 297 adults (>16 years) with IBD were recruited from outpatient clinics (n = 114) and online (n = 183). Participants completed validated questionnaires assessing pain and potential emotional, cognitive and behavioural correlates. Socio-demographic and clinical factors including disease activity were also recorded. RESULTS: 243 (81.8%) of participants reported pain. Of these 243, mean age was 36 years; 153 (63%) had Crohn's disease, 90 (37%) had ulcerative colitis, and 165 (67.9%) were female. 62.6% reported mild, 31.6% moderate and 5.8% severe pain. 40.3% of participants with pain met established criteria for chronic pain and 18.5% reported opioid use. Female gender, smoking, surgery and steroid use were associated with greater pain severity. Psychosocial factors associated with pain-related interference included depression, catastrophising, fear avoidance, lower self-efficacy and worse mental well-being. Regression models explained 45.6% of the variance in pain severity and 49.7% of pain interference. Psychosocial factors explained 9.5% and 24% of this variance respectively when controlling for demographic and clinical variables. CONCLUSIONS: Pain in IBD is significantly associated with cognitive and behavioural factors as well as low mood. This study contributes to a biopsychosocial understanding of pain in IBD and identifies important targets for future interventions.

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