Developing effective In-Service Education for intensive care nurses: Exploring the views of clinical stakeholders in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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Abstract

Background: Evidence-based in-service education (ISE) in the intensive care unit (ICU) is essential to maintaining nurse skill and competence in this complex clinical area. However, there has been limited research that has focused on developing and optimising the specialised training required by ICU nurses working in trauma care. Objectives: To explore the perspectives of ICU clinical stakeholders regarding their needs and preferences for ISE to inform the future development and implementation of effective educational interventions. Design: A qualitative, multiple-case study supported by the “Empowering Education” theoretical framework, which emphasises the importance of stakeholder involvement in education development. Settings: Adult ICUs in three major hospitals located in two geographical areas in Saudi Arabia. Participants: Forty clinical nurses, twelve nurse managers, nine nurse leaders and seven clinical educators participated. Methods: Data were collected through semi-structured interviews followed by focus groups. Framework analysis was used for data analysis. Findings: Stakeholders wanted ISE and training by subject experts characterised by: (i): relevant educational content; (ii): a range of educational techniques and (iii) flexible delivery and format. Nurses also identified factors that encouraged them to participate in ISE including adequate resources and a supportive work environment, whilst heavy workloads, cost and scheduling issues hindered engagement. Conclusion: This paper highlights the importance of considering staff needs and local context when developing in-service ICU education to support nurses' competence. Further recommendations and a proposed framework to develop future ISE in the ICU are provided. Tweetable abstract: The key to effective in-service education for ICU nurses is understanding stakeholders' needs and motivational drivers, whilst addressing barriers to successful implementation.

Original languageEnglish
Article number106092
JournalNurse Education Today
Volume134
Issue number106092
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2024

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