Developmental changes in fronto-striatal glutamate and their association with functioning during inhibitory control in autism spectrum disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder

Viola Hollestein, Jan K Buitelaar, Daniel Brandeis, Tobias Banaschewski, Anna Kaiser, Sarah Hohmann, Bob Oranje, Bram Gooskens, Sarah Durston, Steven C R Williams, David J Lythgoe, Jilly Naaijen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) show overlapping symptomatology and deficits in inhibitory control, which are associated with altered functioning and glutamatergic signaling in fronto-striatal circuitry. These parameters have never been examined together. The purpose of the current study was to investigate functioning during inhibitory control and its association with fronto-striatal glutamate concentrations across these disorders using a multi-center, longitudinal approach. Adolescents with ASD (n = 24), OCD (n = 15) and controls (n = 35) underwent two magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sessions with a one-year interval. This included proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS; n = 74) and functional MRI during an inhibitory control task (n = 53). We investigated 1H-MRS data and fMRI data separately as well as integrated in a multimodal analysis using linear models focusing on diagnosis and continuous measures of overlapping compulsivity symptoms. ACC glutamate was reduced over time in the ASD group compared with controls, while striatal glutamate decreased over time independent of diagnosis. Increased compulsive behavior seemed to be associated with increased striatal activity during failed inhibitory control. The integrated analyses showed differential involvement of increased striatal glutamate during failed but decreased striatal glutamate during successful inhibitory control in the OCD group compared to controls and ASD, suggesting different underlying mechanisms for OCD compared to ASD.

Original languageEnglish
Article number102622
Pages (from-to)102622
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume30
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Mar 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Developmental changes in fronto-striatal glutamate and their association with functioning during inhibitory control in autism spectrum disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this