King's College London

Research portal

Disabling musculoskeletal pain in working populations: Is it the job, the person, or the culture?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

David Coggon, Georgia Ntani, Keith T. Palmer, Vanda E. Felli, Raul Harari, Lope H. Barrero, Sarah A. Felknor, David Gimeno, Anna Cattrell, Consol Serra, Matteo Bonzini, Eleni Solidaki, Eda Merisalu, Rima R. Habib, Farideh Sadeghian, M. Masood Kadir, Sudath S. P. Warnakulasuriya, Ko Matsudaira, Busisiwe Nyantumbu, Malcolm R. Sim & 36 more Helen Harcombe, Ken Cox, Maria H. Marziale, Leila M. Sarquis, Florencia Harari, Rocio Freire, Natalia Harari, Magda V. Monroy, Leonardo A. Quintana, Marianela Rojas, Eduardo J. Salazar Vega, E. Clare Harris, Sergio Vargas-Prada, J. Miguel Martinez, George Delclos, Fernando G. Benavides, Michele Carugno, Marco M. Ferrario, Angela C. Pesatori, Leda Chatzi, Panos Bitsios, Manolis Kogevinas, Kristel Oha, Tuuli Sirk, Ali Sadeghian, Roshini J. Peiris-John, Nalini Sathiakumar, A. Rajitha Wickremasinghe, Noriko Yoshimura, Helen L. Kelsall, Victor C. W. Hoe, Donna M. Urquhart, Sarah Derrett, David McBride, Peter Herbison, Andrew Gray

Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)856-863
Number of pages8
JournalPain
Volume154
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

King's Authors

Abstract

To compare the prevalence of disabling low back pain (DLBP) and disabling wrist/hand pain (DWHP) among groups of workers carrying out similar physical activities in different cultural environments, and to explore explanations for observed differences, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in 18 countries. Standardised questionnaires were used to ascertain pain that interfered with everyday activities and exposure to possible risk factors in 12,426 participants from 47 occupational groups (mostly nurses and office workers). Associations with risk factors were assessed by Poisson regression. The 1-month prevalence of DLBP in nurses varied from 9.6% to 42.6%, and that of DWHP in office workers from 2.2% to 31.6%. Rates of disabling pain at the 2 anatomical sites covaried (r = 0.76), but DLBP tended to be relatively more common in nurses and DWHP in office workers. Established risk factors such as occupational physical activities, psychosocial aspects of work, and tendency to somatise were confirmed, and associations were found also with adverse health beliefs and group awareness of people outside work with musculoskeletal pain. However, after allowance for these risk factors, an up-to 8-fold difference in prevalence remained. Systems of compensation for work-related illness and financial support for health-related incapacity for work appeared to have little influence on the occurrence of symptoms. Our findings indicate large international variation in the prevalence of disabling forearm and back pain among occupational groups carrying out similar tasks, which is only partially explained by the personal and socioeconomic risk factors that were analysed.

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454