Discrepancies in self-reported and actigraphy-based sleep duration are associated with self-reported insomnia symptoms in community-dwelling older adults

Siohan Scarlett, Hugh Nolan, Rose Anne Kenny, Matt O'Connell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives
To establish agreement between self-reported and actigraphy-based total sleep time (TST). To determine the impact of self-reported sleep problems on these measurements.
Design
Cross-sectional study using data from Wave 3 of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (2014-2015).
Participants
Community-dwelling older adults, aged ≥50 years, with self-reported sleep information and ≥4 days of actigraphy-based TST (n=1,520)
Measurement
Self-reported total sleep time, daytime sleepiness, insomnia symptoms (trouble falling asleep, trouble waking too early) measured during a structured self-interview. Actigraphy-based total TST was collected using GENEactiv wrist-worn accelerometers. Demographic characteristics and health information were controlled for. Analyses included descriptive statistics, reliability and agreement analysis using paired t-tests, intra-class correlations and Bland-Altman analysis. Linear regression was used to model associations with measurement discrepancies.
Results
Participants reported that they slept 7.0 hours (SD: 1.4, Range: 2.0-13.0 hours) on average, compared to 7.7 hours (SD: 1.2 hours, Range: 3.0-13.0 hours) recorded by accelerometry. Trouble falling asleep or waking too early “most of the time” were associated with under-reporting of sleep by 2.3, and 2.2 hours respectively. Agreement between measurements had an intra-class correlation of 0.18 and wide 95% limits of agreement (-3.95 to 2.60 hours). Under-reporting of sleep was independently associated with insomnia symptoms.
Conclusion
The agreement between self-reported and actigraphy-based TST in community dwelling older adults was low. Self-reported insomnia symptoms were independently associated with under-reporting of sleep. Studies seeking to measure sleep duration should consider inclusion of questions measuring experience of insomnia symptoms to account for potential influence on measurements.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSleep Health
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 12 Jun 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Discrepancies in self-reported and actigraphy-based sleep duration are associated with self-reported insomnia symptoms in community-dwelling older adults'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this