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Do behaviour-change techniques contribute to the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication? A systematic review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)132-141
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2013

King's Authors

Abstract

This systematic narrative review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) identifies and evaluates the efficacy of behaviour-change techniques explicitly aimed at walking in individuals with intermittent claudication. An electronic database search was conducted up to December 2012. RCTs were included comparing interventions incorporating behaviour-change techniques with usual care, walking advice or exercise therapy for increasing walking in people with intermittent claudication. Studies were evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. The primary outcome variable was maximal walking ability at least 3 months after the start of an intervention. Secondary outcome variables included pain-free walking ability, self-report walking ability and daily walking activity. A total of 3,575 records were retrieved. Of these, six RCTs met the inclusion criteria. As a result of substantial heterogeneity between studies, no meta-analysis was conducted. Overall, 11 behaviour-change techniques were identified; barrier identification with problem solving, self-monitoring and feedback on performance were most frequently reported. There was limited high-quality evidence and findings were inconclusive regarding the utility of behaviour-change techniques for improving walking in people with intermittent claudication. Rigorous, fully powered trials are required that control for exercise dosage and supervision in order to isolate the effect of behaviour-change techniques alongside exercise therapy.

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