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Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments?

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Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments? / Adamo, Nicoletta.

In: Journal of Attention Disorders, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Adamo, N 2019, 'Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments?', Journal of Attention Disorders. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054719879499

APA

Adamo, N. (2019). Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments? Journal of Attention Disorders. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054719879499

Vancouver

Adamo N. Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments? Journal of Attention Disorders. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1177/1087054719879499

Author

Adamo, Nicoletta. / Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments?. In: Journal of Attention Disorders. 2019.

Bibtex Download

@article{2083301cecb14c30af09a130e153af2a,
title = "Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments?",
abstract = "Objective: This study investigates whether anxiety modulates cognitive-performance, electrophysiological and electrodermal processes that we previously found impaired in individuals with ADHD. Method: Self-reported anxiety symptoms, cognitive-electrophysiological measures of response inhibition, working memory, attention, conflict monitoring, error processing, and peripheral arousal during three cognitive tasks were obtained from 87 adolescents and young adults with ADHD and 169 controls. We tested the association of anxiety symptoms with each measure and whether controlling for anxiety symptoms attenuates the ADHD–control difference for each measure. Results: Individuals with ADHD showed significantly elevated anxiety symptoms compared with controls. Only commission errors on a Continuous Performance Test (measuring response inhibition) were significantly associated with anxiety symptoms and only among controls, with the ADHD–control difference in this measure remaining significant. Conclusion: Using a wide range of cognitive, electrophysiological, and electrodermal measures, our investigation suggests, overall, limited malleability of these impairments in individuals with ADHD irrespective of their levels of anxiety.",
keywords = "anxiety, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, cognitive performance, comorbidity, event-related potentials",
author = "Nicoletta Adamo",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1177/1087054719879499",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Attention Disorders",
issn = "1087-0547",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does co-occurring anxiety modulate ADHD-related cognitive and neurophysiological impairments?

AU - Adamo, Nicoletta

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: This study investigates whether anxiety modulates cognitive-performance, electrophysiological and electrodermal processes that we previously found impaired in individuals with ADHD. Method: Self-reported anxiety symptoms, cognitive-electrophysiological measures of response inhibition, working memory, attention, conflict monitoring, error processing, and peripheral arousal during three cognitive tasks were obtained from 87 adolescents and young adults with ADHD and 169 controls. We tested the association of anxiety symptoms with each measure and whether controlling for anxiety symptoms attenuates the ADHD–control difference for each measure. Results: Individuals with ADHD showed significantly elevated anxiety symptoms compared with controls. Only commission errors on a Continuous Performance Test (measuring response inhibition) were significantly associated with anxiety symptoms and only among controls, with the ADHD–control difference in this measure remaining significant. Conclusion: Using a wide range of cognitive, electrophysiological, and electrodermal measures, our investigation suggests, overall, limited malleability of these impairments in individuals with ADHD irrespective of their levels of anxiety.

AB - Objective: This study investigates whether anxiety modulates cognitive-performance, electrophysiological and electrodermal processes that we previously found impaired in individuals with ADHD. Method: Self-reported anxiety symptoms, cognitive-electrophysiological measures of response inhibition, working memory, attention, conflict monitoring, error processing, and peripheral arousal during three cognitive tasks were obtained from 87 adolescents and young adults with ADHD and 169 controls. We tested the association of anxiety symptoms with each measure and whether controlling for anxiety symptoms attenuates the ADHD–control difference for each measure. Results: Individuals with ADHD showed significantly elevated anxiety symptoms compared with controls. Only commission errors on a Continuous Performance Test (measuring response inhibition) were significantly associated with anxiety symptoms and only among controls, with the ADHD–control difference in this measure remaining significant. Conclusion: Using a wide range of cognitive, electrophysiological, and electrodermal measures, our investigation suggests, overall, limited malleability of these impairments in individuals with ADHD irrespective of their levels of anxiety.

KW - anxiety

KW - attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

KW - cognitive performance

KW - comorbidity

KW - event-related potentials

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85075034680&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1087054719879499

DO - 10.1177/1087054719879499

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Attention Disorders

JF - Journal of Attention Disorders

SN - 1087-0547

ER -

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