Duration of mechanical ventilation and prediction of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and home oxygen in extremely preterm infants: Duration of ventilation, BPD and home oxygen

Theodore Dassios, Emma Williams, Ann Hickey, Anne Greenough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)
30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim: To determine whether the duration of invasive ventilation predicted the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and need for discharge home on supplementary oxygen in extremely preterm infants. Methods: Retrospective whole-population study of all infants <28 weeks of gestation admitted to a neonatal unit in England between 2014 and 2018. BPD development was defined as any respiratory support at 36 weeks postmenstrual age. The performance of the duration of mechanical ventilation to predict BPD or discharge home on oxygen was assessed by receiver operator characteristic curve analysis. Results: The 11,806 infants had a median (IQR) gestational age of 26.0(24.9–27.1) weeks and birthweight of 0.81(0.67–0.96) kg. At discharge from neonatal care, 9,415 infants (79.7%) were alive. The incidence of BPD was 57.5% and of home oxygen 29.4%. Mechanical ventilation duration had areas under the curve of 0.793 and 0.703 in predicting BPD and home oxygen, respectively. Mechanical ventilation for >8 days predicted BPD development with 71% sensitivity and 71% specificity and mechanical ventilation for >10 days predicted discharge on home oxygen with 66% sensitivity and 65% specificity. Conclusion: In extremely preterm infants, the duration of invasive support predicted BPD and need for home oxygen with moderate sensitivity and specificity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2052-2058
Number of pages7
JournalActa Paediatrica
Volume110
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

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