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Early experience of transcatheter correction of superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect with partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mounir Riahi, Mari Nieves Velasco Forte, Nick Byrne, Anthony Hermuzi, Matthew Jones, Alban Elouen Baruteau, Israel Valverde, Shakeel A. Qureshi, Eric Rosenthal

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)868-875
Number of pages8
JournalEurointervention
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
PublishedOct 2018

King's Authors

Abstract

Aims: Superior sinus venosus atrial septal defect (SVASD) is commonly associated with partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (PAPVD). We aimed to describe the first series of percutaneous SVASD and PAPVD correction using a two-step simulation for procedural planning. Methods and results: Patients with SVASD and right PAPVD with a clinical indication for correction were selected. They underwent an ex vivo procedural simulation on a 3D-printed model followed by an in vivo simulation using balloon inflation in the targeted stent landing zone. The percutaneous procedure consisted in deploying a 10-zig custom-made covered stent in the SVC-RA junction. Five patients were referred for preprocedural evaluation and were deemed suitable for percutaneous correction. The procedure was successful in all patients with no residual interatrial shunt and successful redirection of the pulmonary venous drainage to the left atrium. At a median clinical follow-up of 8.1 months (2.6-19.8), no adverse events were noted, and all patients showed clinical improvement. During follow-up, transthoracic echocardiography and multidetector cardiac tomography in four patients or invasive angiography in one patient demonstrated a patent SVC stent, and no residual SVASD and unobstructed PV drainage in all patients. Conclusions: In selected patients using a two-stage simulation strategy, percutaneous correction of SVASD with PAPVD is feasible and safe, and led to favourable short-term outcomes.

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