Effect of a brief physical activity-based presentation by a former patient for men treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: a mixed methods pilot study

Louis Fox, Theresa Wiseman, Declan Cahill, Louisa Fleure, Janette Kinsella, Emily Curtis, Nicola Peat, Mieke Van Hemelrijck

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2 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Purpose: Existing research indicates that physical activity (PA) is beneficial to men with prostate cancer (PCa). We examined the potential of a single-contact peer-support-based behavioural intervention to promote PA engagement in men treated for PCa. Methods: A mixed methods design was employed, comprising a two-arm pragmatic trial and semi-structured interviews. The intervention was a 10-min PA-based presentation by a former patient, delivered in group seminars that are provided for patients as standard care. Seminars were alternately allocated to (a) cancer exercise specialist talk + patient speaker talk or (b) cancer exercise specialist talk only. Self-reported PA, exercise motivation, quality of life, fatigue and clinical and demographic characteristics were obtained from n = 148 (intervention: n = 69; control: n = 79) patients immediately prior to the seminar, and at follow-up ≈ 100 days later. Data were analysed using ANCOVA models and χ 2 tests. Fourteen semi-structured interviews with intervention participants, which explored how the intervention was experienced, were analysed using a grounded theory-style approach. Results: The intervention had no significant effect on quantitatively self-reported PA (p = 0.4). However, the intervention was statistically and clinically beneficial for fatigue (p = 0.04) and quality of life (p = 0.01). Qualitative analysis showed that the intervention was beneficial to psychological wellbeing and some participants had increased intention to engage in PA as a result of the intervention. Conclusions: A brief one-off PA-based presentation for men with PCa, delivered by a former patient alongside cancer exercise specialist advice, may result in clinically significant benefits to quality of life and may influence PA intention in certain individuals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)145-154
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Behaviour
  • Cancer
  • Exercise
  • Oncology
  • Physical activity
  • Prostate
  • Prostatectomy
  • Quality of life
  • Rehabilitation
  • Self-management

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