Effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on clinical outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (ERICCA): rationale and study design of a multi-centre randomized double-blinded controlled clinical trial

Derek J. Hausenloy, Luciano Candilio, Chris Laing, Gudrun Kunst, John Pepper, Shyam Kolvekar, Richard Evans, Steve Robertson, Rosemary Knight, Cono Ariti, Tim Clayton, Derek M. Yellon*, ERICCA Trial Investigators

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    88 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background
    Novel cardioprotective strategies are required to improve clinical outcomes in high risk patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) +/- A valve surgery. Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIC), in which brief episodes of non-lethal ischemia and reperfusion are applied to the arm or leg, has been demonstrated to reduce perioperative myocardial injury following CABG +/- A valve surgery. Whether RIC can improve clinical outcomes in this setting is unknown and is investigated in the effect of remote ischemic preconditioning on clinical outcomes (ERICCA) trial in patients undergoing CABG surgery. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01247545).

    Methods
    The ERICCA trial is a multicentre randomized double-blinded controlled clinical trial which will recruit 1,610 high-risk patients (Additive Euroscore a parts per thousand yen 5) undergoing CABG +/- A valve surgery using blood cardioplegia via 27 tertiary centres over 2 years. The primary combined endpoint will be cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization and stroke at 1 year. Secondary endpoints will include peri-operative myocardial and acute kidney injury, intensive care unit and hospital stay, inotrope score, left ventricular ejection fraction, changes of quality of life and exercise tolerance. Patients will be randomized to receive after induction of anesthesia either RIC (4 cycles of 5 min inflation to 200 mmHg and 5 min deflation of a blood pressure cuff placed on the upper arm) or sham RIC (4 cycles of simulated inflations and deflations of the blood pressure cuff).

    Implications
    The findings from the ERICCA trial have the potential to demonstrate that RIC, a simple, non-invasive and virtually cost-free intervention, can improve clinical outcomes in higher-risk patients undergoing CABG +/- A valve surgery.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)339-348
    Number of pages10
    JournalClinical Research In Cardiology
    Volume101
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2012

    Keywords

    • Remote preconditioning
    • Ischaemia
    • Reperfusion
    • Clinical trial
    • CABG surgery
    • ACUTE KIDNEY INJURY
    • CARDIAC TROPONIN-T
    • ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
    • ACUTE-RENAL-FAILURE
    • REPERFUSION INJURY
    • RISK-FACTORS
    • PROSPECTIVE COHORT
    • ANEURYSM REPAIR
    • SHORT-TERM
    • HEART

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