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Effect of the ceramic translucency on the long-term water sorption and solubility of resin cements

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ana Paula Menezes Vaz Queiroz, Mariana Menezes Vaz Queiroz, Saryta Argolo, Richard Mark Foxton, Paula Mathias, Andrea Nóbrega Cavalcanti

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere201704
JournalBrazilian Journal of Oral Sciences
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

King's Authors

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of the translucency of ceramic on water sorption and solubility of resin cements over time. Methods: Lithium disilicate ceramic slides (15x15x1 mm), A1 in color and with different translucencies (high-medium-low) were manufactured; and a glass slide with similar dimension was used as control. Under every slide, 15 specimens (8x0.5 mm) from each resin cement were prepared: light-cured (RelyX Veneer); conventional dual-cured (RelyX ARC); and self-adhesive dual-cured (Rely-X U200). The specimens were then sub-divided according to the period of evaluation (immediately, after 6 and 12 months of storage) (n=5). To evaluate the loss or gain of mass, the specimens were dried until a constant mass was reached. Subsequently, they were divided according to the respective period of storage at 37°C in distilled water and weighed immediately following removal from water. After each period, specimens underwent a new dehydration. Values from water sorption and solubility were calculated and statistically analyzed (Anova 3-way/Tukey test). Results: The lower translucency resulted in greater water sorption and solubility for all cements, regardless of the experimental period. The self-adhesive dual-cured cement showed higher water sorption under all experimental periods and had worse values after 1 year aging. Differences among solubility could only be detected after aging, and the light-cured material had higher values after 6 and 12 months. Conclusions: It could be concluded that the low degree of translucency can negatively influence the passage of light and interfere on the durability of the resin cement. The conventional dual-cured resinous agent seemed to be less affected by such condition.

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