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Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex

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Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex. / Kienzle, Benjamin.

In: Global Policy, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.11.2019, p. 486-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Kienzle, B 2019, 'Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex', Global Policy, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 486-496. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12719

APA

Kienzle, B. (2019). Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex. Global Policy, 10(4), 486-496. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12719

Vancouver

Kienzle B. Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex. Global Policy. 2019 Nov 1;10(4):486-496. https://doi.org/10.1111/1758-5899.12719

Author

Kienzle, Benjamin. / Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex. In: Global Policy. 2019 ; Vol. 10, No. 4. pp. 486-496.

Bibtex Download

@article{ba046417bff4463a8e5e09ed30dab69e,
title = "Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex",
abstract = "In 2004, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 1540, the central international tool to prevent terrorism with Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). In spite of the resolution's strong mandate, its implementation body, the 1540 Committee, has remained weak in terms of enforcement powers, budget allocation and human resources. This article addresses this gap between mandate and implementation capacity. It examines specifically how the 1540 Committee has tried to overcome its structural constraints to achieve its objectives. This has led to two important findings: first, building upon theoretical insights from the management of regime complexes, the article shows that the 1540 Committee has resorted to the orchestration of intermediary actors in the form of other international organizations belonging to the so-called WMD terrorism regime complex. This demonstrates that – contrary to what the current literature suggests – orchestration is used on a large scale in high profile cases of international security. Second, the analysis of the performance of the process of orchestration reveals significant variation. While a large number of intermediary actors have integrated the provisions of Resolution 1540 in their own agendas, the coordination of these actors by the 1540 Committee has remained largely ad hoc and lacked the systematic exchange of relevant information.",
author = "Benjamin Kienzle",
year = "2019",
month = nov,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/1758-5899.12719",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "486--496",
journal = "Global Policy",
issn = "1758-5899",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effective Orchestration? The 1540 Committee and the WMD Terrorism Regime Complex

AU - Kienzle, Benjamin

PY - 2019/11/1

Y1 - 2019/11/1

N2 - In 2004, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 1540, the central international tool to prevent terrorism with Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). In spite of the resolution's strong mandate, its implementation body, the 1540 Committee, has remained weak in terms of enforcement powers, budget allocation and human resources. This article addresses this gap between mandate and implementation capacity. It examines specifically how the 1540 Committee has tried to overcome its structural constraints to achieve its objectives. This has led to two important findings: first, building upon theoretical insights from the management of regime complexes, the article shows that the 1540 Committee has resorted to the orchestration of intermediary actors in the form of other international organizations belonging to the so-called WMD terrorism regime complex. This demonstrates that – contrary to what the current literature suggests – orchestration is used on a large scale in high profile cases of international security. Second, the analysis of the performance of the process of orchestration reveals significant variation. While a large number of intermediary actors have integrated the provisions of Resolution 1540 in their own agendas, the coordination of these actors by the 1540 Committee has remained largely ad hoc and lacked the systematic exchange of relevant information.

AB - In 2004, the United Nations Security Council adopted Resolution 1540, the central international tool to prevent terrorism with Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). In spite of the resolution's strong mandate, its implementation body, the 1540 Committee, has remained weak in terms of enforcement powers, budget allocation and human resources. This article addresses this gap between mandate and implementation capacity. It examines specifically how the 1540 Committee has tried to overcome its structural constraints to achieve its objectives. This has led to two important findings: first, building upon theoretical insights from the management of regime complexes, the article shows that the 1540 Committee has resorted to the orchestration of intermediary actors in the form of other international organizations belonging to the so-called WMD terrorism regime complex. This demonstrates that – contrary to what the current literature suggests – orchestration is used on a large scale in high profile cases of international security. Second, the analysis of the performance of the process of orchestration reveals significant variation. While a large number of intermediary actors have integrated the provisions of Resolution 1540 in their own agendas, the coordination of these actors by the 1540 Committee has remained largely ad hoc and lacked the systematic exchange of relevant information.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071002527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/1758-5899.12719

DO - 10.1111/1758-5899.12719

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85071002527

VL - 10

SP - 486

EP - 496

JO - Global Policy

JF - Global Policy

SN - 1758-5899

IS - 4

ER -

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