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Effects of captions, transcripts and reminders on learning and perceptions of lecture capture: A mixed-methods case study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number20
JournalInternational Journal of Educational Technology in Higher Education
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online date26 Apr 2022
DOIs
Accepted/In press24 Jan 2022
E-pub ahead of print26 Apr 2022
PublishedDec 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This research was part-funded by the host institution and part funded by Echo360 Research Grant. Neither the host institution or Echo360 were involved in the design, implementation, analysis or interpretation of the study. Publisher Copyright: © 2022, The Author(s).

King's Authors

Abstract

Lecture capture is popular within Higher Education, but previous research suggests that students do not always optimally select content to review, nor do they make the most of specific functions. In the current study conducted in the 2019/20 academic year, we used a repeated-measures crossover design to establish the effects of transcripts with closed captioning, and email reminders, on use (self-reported and system analytics), perceptions of lecture capture and student performance, as measured by multiple-choice question (MCQ) tests designed to assess the module learning outcomes. System analytics (N = 129) and survey data (N = 42) were collected from students alongside qualitative data from semi-structured interviews (N = 8). We found that students value lecture capture highly, but do not access it extensively during the teaching period. The availability of transcripts and closed captions did not impact the amount of capture use or performance on MCQ tests, but did result in more positive perceptions of capture, including increased likelihood of recommending it to others. The use of email reminders referring students to specific segments of capture and reminding them of the functionality had no impact on any measure, although qualitative data suggested that the content of reminders may be used in revision rather than during the teaching period, which fell outside the period we investigated. Collectively, these data suggest that the use of captions and transcripts may be beneficial to students by allowing dual processing of visual and audio content, and a searchable resource to help consolidate their learning but there is little evidence to support reminders.

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