King's College London

Research portal

Efficacy of the Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study among infants at high risk of developing food allergy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study team

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1606-1614.e2
JournalJournal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Volume144
Issue number6
Early online date4 Dec 2019
DOIs
Accepted/In press14 Jun 2019
E-pub ahead of print4 Dec 2019
PublishedDec 2019

King's Authors

Abstract

Background: The Enquiring About Tolerance (EAT) study was a randomized trial of the early introduction of allergenic solids into the infant diet from 3 months of age. The intervention effect did not reach statistical significance in the intention-to-treat analysis of the primary outcome. Objective: We sought to determine whether infants at high risk of developing a food allergy benefited from early introduction. Methods: A secondary intention-to-treat analysis was performed of 3 groups: nonwhite infants; infants with visible eczema at enrollment, with severity determined by SCORAD; and infants with enrollment food sensitization (specific IgE ≥0.1 kU/L). Results: Among infants with sensitization to 1 or more foods at enrollment (≥0.1 kU/L), early introduction group (EIG) infants developed significantly less food allergy to 1 or more foods than standard introduction group (SIG) infants (SIG, 34.2%; EIG, 19.2%; P = .03), and among infants with sensitization to egg at enrollment, EIG infants developed less egg allergy (SIG, 48.6%; EIG, 20.0%; P = .01). Similarly, among infants with moderate SCORAD (15-<40) at enrollment, EIG infants developed significantly less food allergy to 1 or more foods (SIG, 46.7%; EIG, 22.6%; P = .048) and less egg allergy (SIG, 43.3%; EIG, 16.1%; P = .02). Conclusion: Early introduction was effective in preventing the development of food allergy in specific groups of infants at high risk of developing food allergy: those sensitized to egg or to any food at enrollment and those with eczema of increasing severity at enrollment. This efficacy occurred despite low adherence to the early introduction regimen. This has significant implications for the new national infant feeding recommendations that are emerging around the world.

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454