Emotional difficulties in early adolescence following severe early deprivation: Findings from the English and Romanian adoptees study

Emma Colvert, M Rutter, C Beckett, J Castle, C Groothues, A Hawkins, J Kreppner, T G O'Connor, S Stevens, E J S Sonuga-Barke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The study assessed conduct and emotional difficulties in a group of Romanian adoptees at age 11, and serves as a follow-up to assessments made when the children were 6 years old. It was found that there was a significant increase in emotional difficulties, but not conduct problems, for the Romanian sample since age 6. It was also found that emotional difficulty was significantly more prevalent at age I I in the Romanian group than in a within-UK adoptee group. Emotional difficulties in the Romanian adoptee group were found to be significantly and strongly related to previous deprivation-specific problems (disinhibited attachment, cognitive impairment, inattention/overactivity and quasi-autism); however, the presence of such early problems did not account fully for the onset of later emotional problems. Five contrasting hypotheses concerning possible mediators for later onset of emotional difficulties for the Romanian group were examined. No links were found to duration of deprivation or other deprivation-related indices, stresses/difficulties in the postadoption family environment, or educational attainment and self-esteem. There was some evidence that emotion recognition might play a role in the emergence of these problems, but other measures of social competence and theory of mind showed no associations with the onset of emotional problems
Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)547 - 567
Number of pages21
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2008

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