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Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices: A qualitative interview study

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Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices : A qualitative interview study. / Rolt, Lucy; Gillett, Karen.

In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 76, No. 7, 01.07.2020, p. 1717-1727.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Rolt, L & Gillett, K 2020, 'Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices: A qualitative interview study', Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 76, no. 7, pp. 1717-1727. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14359

APA

Rolt, L., & Gillett, K. (2020). Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices: A qualitative interview study. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(7), 1717-1727. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14359

Vancouver

Rolt L, Gillett K. Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices: A qualitative interview study. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2020 Jul 1;76(7):1717-1727. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.14359

Author

Rolt, Lucy ; Gillett, Karen. / Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices : A qualitative interview study. In: Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2020 ; Vol. 76, No. 7. pp. 1717-1727.

Bibtex Download

@article{99f1256ba8334fa6bdb1380725850d5a,
title = "Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices: A qualitative interview study",
abstract = "Aim: To establish an understanding of the experiences of newly qualified nurses{\textquoteright} working in hospices from the perspective of both newly qualified and senior nurses. Design: A qualitative interview study. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with six newly qualified nurses and five senior nurses from four UK hospices were conducted between March – July 2017. Results: The hospices involved in this study were among the first to recruit newly qualified nurses. Participants believed that newly qualified nurses coped well with hospice working and received unique opportunities for professional development. Participants identified the value of formal and informal support, however, newly qualified nurses faced negative attitudes from some established staff. Newly qualified nurses expressed concerns about a perceived lack of technical clinical skills training, however, they highlighted gaining end-of-life care and communication skills that would be transferrable to other settings. Participants highlighted the need to allocate more time for education and formal support including preceptorship. Senior staff did not necessarily expect newly qualified nurses to remain in long-term hospice employment suggesting that they could disseminate their hospice learning to future workplaces. Conclusion: This study supports recruitment strategies that increasingly target newly qualified nurses to work in hospices with findings suggesting that hospices can be a suitable environment for recent graduates to work in. The senior nurses in this study viewed the employment of newly qualified nurses in a positive light but shared the concerns of newly qualified nurses regarding skills training. Impact: At a time when hospices need to expand if they are going to meet demand for their services, they along with most areas of healthcare face difficulties recruiting and retaining registered nurses. To increase the appeal of hospice employment, recruitment campaigns aimed at newly qualified nurses should emphasize the transferability of skills gained in hospice settings.",
keywords = "end-of-life, hospice, newly qualified, nurses, nursing, palliative care, preceptorship, qualitative research",
author = "Lucy Rolt and Karen Gillett",
year = "2020",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/jan.14359",
language = "Chinese",
volume = "76",
pages = "1717--1727",
journal = "Journal of Advanced Nursing",
issn = "0309-2402",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "7",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Employing newly qualified nurses to work in hospices

T2 - A qualitative interview study

AU - Rolt, Lucy

AU - Gillett, Karen

PY - 2020/7/1

Y1 - 2020/7/1

N2 - Aim: To establish an understanding of the experiences of newly qualified nurses’ working in hospices from the perspective of both newly qualified and senior nurses. Design: A qualitative interview study. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with six newly qualified nurses and five senior nurses from four UK hospices were conducted between March – July 2017. Results: The hospices involved in this study were among the first to recruit newly qualified nurses. Participants believed that newly qualified nurses coped well with hospice working and received unique opportunities for professional development. Participants identified the value of formal and informal support, however, newly qualified nurses faced negative attitudes from some established staff. Newly qualified nurses expressed concerns about a perceived lack of technical clinical skills training, however, they highlighted gaining end-of-life care and communication skills that would be transferrable to other settings. Participants highlighted the need to allocate more time for education and formal support including preceptorship. Senior staff did not necessarily expect newly qualified nurses to remain in long-term hospice employment suggesting that they could disseminate their hospice learning to future workplaces. Conclusion: This study supports recruitment strategies that increasingly target newly qualified nurses to work in hospices with findings suggesting that hospices can be a suitable environment for recent graduates to work in. The senior nurses in this study viewed the employment of newly qualified nurses in a positive light but shared the concerns of newly qualified nurses regarding skills training. Impact: At a time when hospices need to expand if they are going to meet demand for their services, they along with most areas of healthcare face difficulties recruiting and retaining registered nurses. To increase the appeal of hospice employment, recruitment campaigns aimed at newly qualified nurses should emphasize the transferability of skills gained in hospice settings.

AB - Aim: To establish an understanding of the experiences of newly qualified nurses’ working in hospices from the perspective of both newly qualified and senior nurses. Design: A qualitative interview study. Methods: Semi-structured interviews with six newly qualified nurses and five senior nurses from four UK hospices were conducted between March – July 2017. Results: The hospices involved in this study were among the first to recruit newly qualified nurses. Participants believed that newly qualified nurses coped well with hospice working and received unique opportunities for professional development. Participants identified the value of formal and informal support, however, newly qualified nurses faced negative attitudes from some established staff. Newly qualified nurses expressed concerns about a perceived lack of technical clinical skills training, however, they highlighted gaining end-of-life care and communication skills that would be transferrable to other settings. Participants highlighted the need to allocate more time for education and formal support including preceptorship. Senior staff did not necessarily expect newly qualified nurses to remain in long-term hospice employment suggesting that they could disseminate their hospice learning to future workplaces. Conclusion: This study supports recruitment strategies that increasingly target newly qualified nurses to work in hospices with findings suggesting that hospices can be a suitable environment for recent graduates to work in. The senior nurses in this study viewed the employment of newly qualified nurses in a positive light but shared the concerns of newly qualified nurses regarding skills training. Impact: At a time when hospices need to expand if they are going to meet demand for their services, they along with most areas of healthcare face difficulties recruiting and retaining registered nurses. To increase the appeal of hospice employment, recruitment campaigns aimed at newly qualified nurses should emphasize the transferability of skills gained in hospice settings.

KW - end-of-life

KW - hospice

KW - newly qualified

KW - nurses

KW - nursing

KW - palliative care

KW - preceptorship

KW - qualitative research

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85083162077&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/jan.14359

DO - 10.1111/jan.14359

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85083162077

VL - 76

SP - 1717

EP - 1727

JO - Journal of Advanced Nursing

JF - Journal of Advanced Nursing

SN - 0309-2402

IS - 7

ER -

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