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Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA

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Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA. / Duffy, Henry J.; Letessier, Tom B.; Koldewey, Heather J.; Dawson, Terence P.; Irving, Robert A.

In: Frontiers in Marine Science, Vol. 8, 647685, 25.05.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Duffy, HJ, Letessier, TB, Koldewey, HJ, Dawson, TP & Irving, RA 2021, 'Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA', Frontiers in Marine Science, vol. 8, 647685. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.647685

APA

Duffy, H. J., Letessier, T. B., Koldewey, H. J., Dawson, T. P., & Irving, R. A. (2021). Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA. Frontiers in Marine Science, 8, [647685]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.647685

Vancouver

Duffy HJ, Letessier TB, Koldewey HJ, Dawson TP, Irving RA. Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA. Frontiers in Marine Science. 2021 May 25;8. 647685. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmars.2021.647685

Author

Duffy, Henry J. ; Letessier, Tom B. ; Koldewey, Heather J. ; Dawson, Terence P. ; Irving, Robert A. / Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA. In: Frontiers in Marine Science. 2021 ; Vol. 8.

Bibtex Download

@article{d22c2d0cd9d6435289cf39dfd504a174,
title = "Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA",
abstract = "The Pitcairn Islands, located in the central South Pacific, contain near-pristine marine ecosystems which support unique fish assemblages, together with both endemic and threatened species. Pitcairn itself is the only inhabited island in the group and, before this study, the environmental impact of local fisheries was unclear, with little data to inform conservation and management. In 2014–2015 coastal fish populations were assessed using a mixed methods approach: a newly introduced system of fishers{\textquoteright} catch monitoring and Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems (BRUVS). Thirty-nine BRUVS deployments recorded 88 species in total, with small-bodied herbivores (e.g., Kyphosus pacificus) and mesopredators (e.g., Xanthichthys mento) dominating a “bottom heavy” assemblage. Several large pelagic predators were recorded, but reef-associated predators were rare with only one shark observed. Pitcairn{\textquoteright}s top predator assemblage was relatively impoverished compared to global “pristine” sites, including other islands within the Pitcairn group. Top predator scarcity may be explained by local artisanal fisheries, which have historically targeted sharks and other large reef carnivores, and these taxa may not have recovered despite subsequent declines in fishing pressure. The dominant small-bodied species may have proliferated as a result of diminished top predator populations. Subsequent to BRUVS sampling, a local fisheries officer post was created to collate catch data from coastal fishers. Regular returns were obtained from over half of the active fishers (representing approximately 80% of catches), with K. pacificus also dominating catches and the small grouper Epinephelus fasciatus frequently targeted. Thirty fish species were represented in the recorded catch over a 12 month period. Results were shared with the local community, providing a basis for the cooperative design of a Fisheries Management Plan. This plan ensured traditional fisheries could continue in a sustainable manner within Coastal Conservation Zones around each of the four Pitcairn Islands, established within the large, no-take Marine Protected Area designated in 2016, covering the entire Pitcairn Exclusive Economic Zone. Monitoring of Pitcairn{\textquoteright}s artisanal fisheries should be continued beyond this one-off study in order to inform adjustment of the Fisheries Management Plan, as the ongoing island fishery may still have consequences for long-term sustainability, particularly for pelagic species caught in coastal waters which remain a significant data gap.",
keywords = "BRUVS, coastal waters, coral and rocky reefs, marine protected area, Pitcairn Island, remote island, sustainable fisheries",
author = "Duffy, {Henry J.} and Letessier, {Tom B.} and Koldewey, {Heather J.} and Dawson, {Terence P.} and Irving, {Robert A.}",
note = "Funding Information: We would like to thank the all those on Pitcairn Island who provided homestay accommodation to the Darwin team members during their stays on Pitcairn and who generously provided assistance with various aspects of the project. In particular, we should like to thank Michele Christian, Division Manager, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of Pitcairn Islands; Brian Young, Charlene Warren-Peu and Sue O{\textquoteright}Keefe, past and present Fisheries Officers, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of the Pitcairn Islands; and Randy Christian, Operations Division, for the construction of the five BRUVS frames. We are also thankful for the support from the Center for Marine Future at UWA toward the BRUVS deployments, including field preparation, stereo calibration, and video analysis. Funding Information: Funding for this work was provided by the United Kingdom{\textquoteright}s Darwin Initiative, Project No. 20-006 (a sustainable marine and fisheries management plan for the Pitcairn Islands), which ran from 2013 to 2017. Funding Information: We would like to thank the all those on Pitcairn Island who provided homestay accommodation to the Darwin team members during their stays on Pitcairn and who generously provided assistance with various aspects of the project. In particular, we should like to thank Michele Christian, Division Manager, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of Pitcairn Islands; Brian Young, Charlene Warren-Peu and Sue O?Keefe, past and present Fisheries Officers, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of the Pitcairn Islands; and Randy Christian, Operations Division, for the construction of the five BRUVS frames. We are also thankful for the support from the Center for Marine Future at UWA toward the BRUVS deployments, including field preparation, stereo calibration, and video analysis. Finally we are grateful to JS and Emily Hardman of the United Kingdom?s Marine Management Organisation for a number of factual corrections to the text. Funding. Funding for this work was provided by the United Kingdom?s Darwin Initiative, Project No. 20-006 (a sustainable marine and fisheries management plan for the Pitcairn Islands), which ran from 2013 to 2017. Publisher Copyright: {\textcopyright} Copyright {\textcopyright} 2021 Duffy, Letessier, Koldewey, Dawson and Irving. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "25",
doi = "10.3389/fmars.2021.647685",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "Frontiers in Marine Science",
issn = "2296-7745",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Ensuring the Sustainability of Coastal Small-Scale Fisheries at Pitcairn Island (South Pacific) Within a Large Scale No-Take MPA

AU - Duffy, Henry J.

AU - Letessier, Tom B.

AU - Koldewey, Heather J.

AU - Dawson, Terence P.

AU - Irving, Robert A.

N1 - Funding Information: We would like to thank the all those on Pitcairn Island who provided homestay accommodation to the Darwin team members during their stays on Pitcairn and who generously provided assistance with various aspects of the project. In particular, we should like to thank Michele Christian, Division Manager, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of Pitcairn Islands; Brian Young, Charlene Warren-Peu and Sue O’Keefe, past and present Fisheries Officers, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of the Pitcairn Islands; and Randy Christian, Operations Division, for the construction of the five BRUVS frames. We are also thankful for the support from the Center for Marine Future at UWA toward the BRUVS deployments, including field preparation, stereo calibration, and video analysis. Funding Information: Funding for this work was provided by the United Kingdom’s Darwin Initiative, Project No. 20-006 (a sustainable marine and fisheries management plan for the Pitcairn Islands), which ran from 2013 to 2017. Funding Information: We would like to thank the all those on Pitcairn Island who provided homestay accommodation to the Darwin team members during their stays on Pitcairn and who generously provided assistance with various aspects of the project. In particular, we should like to thank Michele Christian, Division Manager, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of Pitcairn Islands; Brian Young, Charlene Warren-Peu and Sue O?Keefe, past and present Fisheries Officers, Environmental, Conservation and Natural Resources Division, Government of the Pitcairn Islands; and Randy Christian, Operations Division, for the construction of the five BRUVS frames. We are also thankful for the support from the Center for Marine Future at UWA toward the BRUVS deployments, including field preparation, stereo calibration, and video analysis. Finally we are grateful to JS and Emily Hardman of the United Kingdom?s Marine Management Organisation for a number of factual corrections to the text. Funding. Funding for this work was provided by the United Kingdom?s Darwin Initiative, Project No. 20-006 (a sustainable marine and fisheries management plan for the Pitcairn Islands), which ran from 2013 to 2017. Publisher Copyright: © Copyright © 2021 Duffy, Letessier, Koldewey, Dawson and Irving. Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

PY - 2021/5/25

Y1 - 2021/5/25

N2 - The Pitcairn Islands, located in the central South Pacific, contain near-pristine marine ecosystems which support unique fish assemblages, together with both endemic and threatened species. Pitcairn itself is the only inhabited island in the group and, before this study, the environmental impact of local fisheries was unclear, with little data to inform conservation and management. In 2014–2015 coastal fish populations were assessed using a mixed methods approach: a newly introduced system of fishers’ catch monitoring and Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems (BRUVS). Thirty-nine BRUVS deployments recorded 88 species in total, with small-bodied herbivores (e.g., Kyphosus pacificus) and mesopredators (e.g., Xanthichthys mento) dominating a “bottom heavy” assemblage. Several large pelagic predators were recorded, but reef-associated predators were rare with only one shark observed. Pitcairn’s top predator assemblage was relatively impoverished compared to global “pristine” sites, including other islands within the Pitcairn group. Top predator scarcity may be explained by local artisanal fisheries, which have historically targeted sharks and other large reef carnivores, and these taxa may not have recovered despite subsequent declines in fishing pressure. The dominant small-bodied species may have proliferated as a result of diminished top predator populations. Subsequent to BRUVS sampling, a local fisheries officer post was created to collate catch data from coastal fishers. Regular returns were obtained from over half of the active fishers (representing approximately 80% of catches), with K. pacificus also dominating catches and the small grouper Epinephelus fasciatus frequently targeted. Thirty fish species were represented in the recorded catch over a 12 month period. Results were shared with the local community, providing a basis for the cooperative design of a Fisheries Management Plan. This plan ensured traditional fisheries could continue in a sustainable manner within Coastal Conservation Zones around each of the four Pitcairn Islands, established within the large, no-take Marine Protected Area designated in 2016, covering the entire Pitcairn Exclusive Economic Zone. Monitoring of Pitcairn’s artisanal fisheries should be continued beyond this one-off study in order to inform adjustment of the Fisheries Management Plan, as the ongoing island fishery may still have consequences for long-term sustainability, particularly for pelagic species caught in coastal waters which remain a significant data gap.

AB - The Pitcairn Islands, located in the central South Pacific, contain near-pristine marine ecosystems which support unique fish assemblages, together with both endemic and threatened species. Pitcairn itself is the only inhabited island in the group and, before this study, the environmental impact of local fisheries was unclear, with little data to inform conservation and management. In 2014–2015 coastal fish populations were assessed using a mixed methods approach: a newly introduced system of fishers’ catch monitoring and Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems (BRUVS). Thirty-nine BRUVS deployments recorded 88 species in total, with small-bodied herbivores (e.g., Kyphosus pacificus) and mesopredators (e.g., Xanthichthys mento) dominating a “bottom heavy” assemblage. Several large pelagic predators were recorded, but reef-associated predators were rare with only one shark observed. Pitcairn’s top predator assemblage was relatively impoverished compared to global “pristine” sites, including other islands within the Pitcairn group. Top predator scarcity may be explained by local artisanal fisheries, which have historically targeted sharks and other large reef carnivores, and these taxa may not have recovered despite subsequent declines in fishing pressure. The dominant small-bodied species may have proliferated as a result of diminished top predator populations. Subsequent to BRUVS sampling, a local fisheries officer post was created to collate catch data from coastal fishers. Regular returns were obtained from over half of the active fishers (representing approximately 80% of catches), with K. pacificus also dominating catches and the small grouper Epinephelus fasciatus frequently targeted. Thirty fish species were represented in the recorded catch over a 12 month period. Results were shared with the local community, providing a basis for the cooperative design of a Fisheries Management Plan. This plan ensured traditional fisheries could continue in a sustainable manner within Coastal Conservation Zones around each of the four Pitcairn Islands, established within the large, no-take Marine Protected Area designated in 2016, covering the entire Pitcairn Exclusive Economic Zone. Monitoring of Pitcairn’s artisanal fisheries should be continued beyond this one-off study in order to inform adjustment of the Fisheries Management Plan, as the ongoing island fishery may still have consequences for long-term sustainability, particularly for pelagic species caught in coastal waters which remain a significant data gap.

KW - BRUVS

KW - coastal waters

KW - coral and rocky reefs

KW - marine protected area

KW - Pitcairn Island

KW - remote island

KW - sustainable fisheries

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85107401354&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3389/fmars.2021.647685

DO - 10.3389/fmars.2021.647685

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85107401354

VL - 8

JO - Frontiers in Marine Science

JF - Frontiers in Marine Science

SN - 2296-7745

M1 - 647685

ER -

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