Executive Function and Academic Achievement in Primary School Children: The Use of Task-Related Processing Speed

Rebecca Gordon, James H. Smith-Spark, Elizabeth Newton, Lucy Henry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article argues that individual differences in processing speed are important in the relationship between executive function (EF) and academic achievement in primary school children. It proposes that processing times within EF tasks can be used to predict academic attainment and aid in the development of intervention programmes. The evidence discussed here provides opportunities to develop a new approach to examining the relationship between EF and academic achievement. Future studies should clarify the role of executive-loaded processing speed in tasks by measuring individual differences in processing times. Using these as predictors of academic attainment, may allow identification of children who, due to slower processing speeds, struggle with academic tasks when there is an executive load.
Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume9
Issue number582
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Executive Function
  • Working memory
  • Academic achievement
  • Processing speed
  • Updating
  • Attention
  • Inhibition
  • Task switching

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