Experiences of acquired brain injury survivors participating in online and hybrid performance arts programmes: an ethnographic study

Carmine Pariante, Anthony Woods, Carolina Branco Estevao, Nikki Crane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background

Performance arts can benefit people with acquired brain injury (ABI). This study explored the online delivery during COVID-19 restrictions, of a performance art intervention through the experiences of participants, artists and facilitators.
Methods

Two community-based programmes were delivered. Online ethnographic observations and semi-structured interviews with participants, artists and facilitators were completed.
Results

The programmes benefited participants by addressing loneliness and isolation; building confidence through peer support; improving physical limitations through movement; improving communication through music and vocal work; and using poetry, visual arts, metaphor and performance to make sense of participants’ experiences. Participants had mixed experiences of participation, but it was an acceptable alternative to in-person arts interventions for those who overcame digital challenges.
Conclusions

ABI survivors can engage in online performance art programmes and find participation valuable for their health, well-being, and recovery. More work is needed to explore the generalisability of these findings, especially given digital poverty.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalArts & Health: An International Journal for Research, Policy and Practice
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2023

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