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Experiences of healthcare for mothers of children with ongoing illness, living in deprived neighbourhoods health and place

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Article number102661
JournalHealth and Place
Volume71
DOIs
PublishedSep 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: Support : This CYPHP Evaluation study was funded by Guy's and St Thomas's Charity (Ref. HIF180101KCL ) and was carried out by the Child Health Service Policy and Research Group within the Department of Women and Children's Health at King's College London . The evaluation is a partnership between Guy's and St Thomas's Healthcare NHS Trust, King's College Healthcare NHS Trust and King's College London and part of the Institute of Women and Children's Health. This study/project is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London (NIHR ARC South London) at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust . The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care. Funding Information: Support: This CYPHP Evaluation study was funded by Guy's and St Thomas's Charity (Ref. HIF180101KCL) and was carried out by the Child Health Service Policy and Research Group within the Department of Women and Children's Health at King's College London. The evaluation is a partnership between Guy's and St Thomas's Healthcare NHS Trust, King's College Healthcare NHS Trust and King's College London and part of the Institute of Women and Children's Health. This study/project is supported by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration South London (NIHR ARC South London) at King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NIHR or the Department of Health and Social Care.For one mother, her sense of shame was shaped by her view of cultural norms. Silvia, who had recently moved to the UK, described her experience of health seeking in her home country where self-reliance is the norm. Unsatisfactory encounters with healthcare providers in her home country discouraged her from seeking support within the UK, reinforcing her child's vulnerability. Silvia's memories of seeking help in her home country were still hurtful, and she grew upset when discussing this with the researcher. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Copyright: Copyright 2021 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Purpose: While the association between socioeconomic deprivation and children's poor health is clear, the complex pathways linking socioeconomic deprivation with access to care and health inequalities are less well understood. This analysis sought to understand the root cause of these inequalities by exploring how mothers living in deprived neighborhoods support their sick children, and their experiences with primary care. Methods: Interview transcripts from eight mothers, living in socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods, were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results: Participants described their experiences in three distinct themes. Each theme highlights the importance of the mother's agency, voice, and power in supporting their child's health, and the crucial role played by the health system in addressing, maintaining, or reinforcing health inequalities. Participants used several strategies to address these health inequalities, which included fighting against the health system, using past experiences to explain health needs, and support from friends and family. Conclusion: Although the health system is an essential resource to support families, encounters with primary care may fail to address health inequalities and may therefore exacerbate existing health inequalities for families living in deprived neighborhoods, irrespective of health system financing and ability to pay.

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