Experiences of Mental Health Care Among Women Treated for Postpartum Psychosis in England: A Qualitative Study

Emily Roxburgh, Nicola Morant, Clare Dolman, Sonia Johnson*, Billie Lever Taylor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Postpartum psychosis has been found to affect 0.89–2.6 per 1000 women. Onset is typically rapid and severe. Early recognition and appropriate treatment are crucial for a good prognosis. Our aim in this study was to understand women’s experiences of mental health care and services for psychosis in the postnatal period. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 women who reported being treated for postpartum psychosis. Findings were analysed thematically. Women reported that healthcare professionals across maternity and mental health services often lacked awareness and knowledge of postpartum psychosis and did not always keep them or their partners/families informed, supported, and involved. Women wanted better collaboration between and within services, and more efficient, appropriate, and timely care. They valued inpatient services that could meet their needs, favouring Mother and Baby Units over general psychiatric wards. Early Intervention in Psychosis services and specialist perinatal community mental health teams were also well liked.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-252
Number of pages10
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
Volume59
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022

Keywords

  • Partners
  • Postnatal care
  • Postpartum psychosis
  • Qualitative
  • Services
  • Women

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