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Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience

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Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience. / Hashmi, Salim; Vanderwert, Ross E.; Price, Hope A.; Gerson, Sarah A.

In: Frontiers In Human Neuroscience, Vol. 14, 560176, 01.10.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Hashmi, S, Vanderwert, RE, Price, HA & Gerson, SA 2020, 'Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience', Frontiers In Human Neuroscience, vol. 14, 560176. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176

APA

Hashmi, S., Vanderwert, R. E., Price, H. A., & Gerson, S. A. (2020). Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience. Frontiers In Human Neuroscience, 14, [560176]. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176

Vancouver

Hashmi S, Vanderwert RE, Price HA, Gerson SA. Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience. Frontiers In Human Neuroscience. 2020 Oct 1;14. 560176. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176

Author

Hashmi, Salim ; Vanderwert, Ross E. ; Price, Hope A. ; Gerson, Sarah A. / Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience. In: Frontiers In Human Neuroscience. 2020 ; Vol. 14.

Bibtex Download

@article{ddf1a7a2f94c4d4a9105f1ceac7f4f96,
title = "Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience",
abstract = "It has long been hypothesized that pretend play is beneficial to social and cognitive development. However, there is little evidence regarding the neural regions that are active while children engage in pretend play. We examined the activation of prefrontal and posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) regions using near-infrared spectroscopy while 42 4- to 8-year-old children freely played with dolls or tablet games with a social partner or by themselves. Social play activated right prefrontal regions more than solo play. Children engaged the pSTS during solo doll play but not during solo tablet play, suggesting they were rehearsing social cognitive skills more with dolls. These findings suggest social play utilizes multiple neural regions and highlight how doll play can achieve similar patterns of activation, even when children play by themselves. Doll play may provide a unique opportunity for children to practice social interactions important for developing social-emotional skills, such as empathy.",
keywords = "development, empathy, fNIRS (functional near infrared spectroscopy), play, social processing",
author = "Salim Hashmi and Vanderwert, {Ross E.} and Price, {Hope A.} and Gerson, {Sarah A.}",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "Frontiers In Human Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5161",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring the Benefits of Doll Play Through Neuroscience

AU - Hashmi, Salim

AU - Vanderwert, Ross E.

AU - Price, Hope A.

AU - Gerson, Sarah A.

PY - 2020/10/1

Y1 - 2020/10/1

N2 - It has long been hypothesized that pretend play is beneficial to social and cognitive development. However, there is little evidence regarding the neural regions that are active while children engage in pretend play. We examined the activation of prefrontal and posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) regions using near-infrared spectroscopy while 42 4- to 8-year-old children freely played with dolls or tablet games with a social partner or by themselves. Social play activated right prefrontal regions more than solo play. Children engaged the pSTS during solo doll play but not during solo tablet play, suggesting they were rehearsing social cognitive skills more with dolls. These findings suggest social play utilizes multiple neural regions and highlight how doll play can achieve similar patterns of activation, even when children play by themselves. Doll play may provide a unique opportunity for children to practice social interactions important for developing social-emotional skills, such as empathy.

AB - It has long been hypothesized that pretend play is beneficial to social and cognitive development. However, there is little evidence regarding the neural regions that are active while children engage in pretend play. We examined the activation of prefrontal and posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) regions using near-infrared spectroscopy while 42 4- to 8-year-old children freely played with dolls or tablet games with a social partner or by themselves. Social play activated right prefrontal regions more than solo play. Children engaged the pSTS during solo doll play but not during solo tablet play, suggesting they were rehearsing social cognitive skills more with dolls. These findings suggest social play utilizes multiple neural regions and highlight how doll play can achieve similar patterns of activation, even when children play by themselves. Doll play may provide a unique opportunity for children to practice social interactions important for developing social-emotional skills, such as empathy.

KW - development

KW - empathy

KW - fNIRS (functional near infrared spectroscopy)

KW - play

KW - social processing

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85092724900&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176

DO - https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2020.560176

M3 - Article

VL - 14

JO - Frontiers In Human Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers In Human Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5161

M1 - 560176

ER -

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