Exploring the relationship between social jetlag with gut microbial composition, diet and cardiometabolic health, in the ZOE PREDICT 1 cohort

Kate Bermingham, Sophie Stensrud, Francesco Asnicar, Ana M. Valdes, Paul W. Franks, Jonathan Wolf, George Hadjigeorgiou, Richard Davies, Tim Spector, Nicola Segata, Sarah E. Berry, Wendy Hall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: In this study, we explore the relationship between social jetlag (SJL), a parameter of circadian misalignment, and gut microbial composition, diet and cardiometabolic health in the ZOE PREDICT 1 cohort (NCT03479866). Methods: We assessed demographic, diet, cardiometabolic, stool metagenomics and postprandial metabolic measures (n = 1002). We used self-reported habitual sleep (n = 934) to calculate SJL (difference in mid-sleep time point of ≥ 1.5 h on week versus weekend days). We tested group differences (SJL vs no-SJL) in cardiometabolic markers and diet (ANCOVA) adjusting for sex, age, BMI, ethnicity, and socio-economic status. We performed comparisons of gut microbial composition using machine learning and association analyses on the species level genome bins present in at least 20% of the samples. Results: The SJL group (16%, n = 145) had a greater proportion of males (39% vs 25%), shorter sleepers (average sleep < 7 h; 5% vs 3%), and were younger (38.4 ± 11.3y vs 46.8 ± 11.7y) compared to the no-SJL group. SJL was associated with a higher relative abundance of 9 gut bacteria and lower abundance of 8 gut bacteria (q < 0.2 and absolute Cohen’s effect size > 0.2), in part mediated by diet. SJL was associated with unfavourable diet quality (less healthful Plant-based Diet Index), higher intakes of potatoes and sugar-sweetened beverages, and lower intakes of fruits, and nuts, and slightly higher markers of inflammation (GlycA and IL-6) compared with no-SJL (P < 0.05 adjusted for covariates); rendered non-significant after multiple testing adjustments. Conclusions: Novel associations between SJL and a more disadvantageous gut microbiome in a cohort of predominantly adequate sleepers highlight the potential implications of SJL for health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3135-3147
Number of pages13
JournalEUROPEAN JOURNAL OF NUTRITION
Volume62
Issue number8
Early online date2 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023

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