Extent and location of intraretinal and subretinal fluid as prognostic factors for the outcome of patients with optic disk pit maculopathy

David H W Steel*, Tom H. Williamson, D. Alistair H Laidlaw, Priyanka Sharma, Matthews Christopher, Jon Rees, Petros Petrou, David G. Charteris, Stephen J. Charles, C. K. Patel, Niels Crama, Ed Herbert, Timothy L. Jackson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To determine if baseline fundoscopic and optical coherence tomography (OCT) features influence the clinical course of optic disk pit maculopathy. Methods: A multicenter retrospective case note review was undertaken, using standardized OCT and clinical data collection. Visual success was defined as at least a two-line visual acuity improvement, anatomical success as full resolution of OCT foveal fluid with restoration of the normal foveal contour, and partial anatomical success as incomplete resolution of the OCT foveal fluid. Outcomes were compared with a synthesis of the literature, using similar eligibility criteria. Results: Of 36 patients (36 eyes), 2 spontaneously improved and 34 underwent surgery. Visual success was achieved in 64% of surgical cases, anatomical success in 36%, and partial anatomical success in 47%. Cases with multilayer intraretinal and subretinal fluid were less likely to have visual success (P = 0.003). Cases where the fluid did not extend to the macular arcade vessels also had better visual and anatomical outcomes (P = 0.004 and 0.005, respectively). Conclusion: Fundoscopic and OCT features can help predict surgical outcome in optic disk pit maculopathy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)110-118
Number of pages9
JournalRetina
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Optic disk pit
  • Optic disk pit maculopathy
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Outcome
  • Vitrectomy

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