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Fetal body MRI and its application to fetal and neonatal treatment: an illustrative review

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Joseph R Davidson, Alena Uus, Jackie Matthew, Alexia Egloff Collado, Maria Deprez, Iain Yardley, Paolo De Coppi, Anna David, Jim Carmichael, Mary Rutherford

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447-458
Number of pages12
JournalThe Lancet Child & Adolescent Health
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
PublishedJun 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This Review was done independently of any directive from a funding source at any institution. The views expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, UK National Health Service (NHS), or UK Department of Health. Many of the images included were acquired as part of the iFIND study, which was supported by a Wellcome Trust Innovative Engineering for Health award (360G-Wellcome-102431_Z_13_Z). All cases shown were acquired through the Department for Perinatal Imaging and Health at St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK, the imaging departmental protocol is outlined in full (panel). The images shown have been reproduced with specific consent of patients; studies were done either as part of the iFIND research study (National Ethics Registration 14/LO/1806) or the clinical service provided by the Perinatal Imaging Centre at St Thomas' Hospital (National Ethics Registration 07/H0707/105). MAR, AME, MD, AU, and JM work within the King's College London School of Biomedical Engineering, supported by the Wellcome Trust EPSRC Centre for Medical Engineering (WT 203148/Z/16/Z) and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, supported by the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at Guy's and St Thomas'. JD, PDC, and AD work within NIHR Biomedical Research Centres for University College London Hospitals, and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Institute of Child Health. Funding Information: This Review was done independently of any directive from a funding source at any institution. The views expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NIHR, UK National Health Service (NHS), or UK Department of Health. Many of the images included were acquired as part of the iFIND study, which was supported by a Wellcome Trust Innovative Engineering for Health award ( 360G-Wellcome-102431_Z_13_Z ). All cases shown were acquired through the Department for Perinatal Imaging and Health at St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK, the imaging departmental protocol is outlined in full ( panel ). The images shown have been reproduced with specific consent of patients; studies were done either as part of the iFIND research study (National Ethics Registration 14/LO/1806) or the clinical service provided by the Perinatal Imaging Centre at St Thomas' Hospital (National Ethics Registration 07/H0707/105). MAR, AME, MD, AU, and JM work within the King's College London School of Biomedical Engineering, supported by the Wellcome Trust EPSRC Centre for Medical Engineering (WT 203148/Z/16/Z) and the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre based at Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, supported by the NIHR Clinical Research Facility at Guy's and St Thomas'. JD, PDC, and AD work within NIHR Biomedical Research Centres for University College London Hospitals, and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Institute of Child Health. Publisher Copyright: © 2021 Elsevier Ltd

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King's Authors

Abstract

This Review depicts the evolving role of MRI in the diagnosis and prognostication of anomalies of the fetal body, here including head and neck, thorax, abdomen and spine. A review of the current literature on the latest developments in antenatal imaging for diagnosis and prognostication of congenital anomalies is coupled with illustrative cases in true radiological planes with viewable three-dimensional video models that show the potential of post-acquisition reconstruction protocols. We discuss the benefits and limitations of fetal MRI, from anomaly detection, to classification and prognostication, and defines the role of imaging in the decision to proceed to fetal intervention, across the breadth of included conditions. We also consider the current capabilities of ultrasound and explore how MRI and ultrasound can complement each other in the future of fetal imaging.

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