King's College London

Research portal

Film and fashion in Shanghai: What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Standard

Film and fashion in Shanghai : What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution. / Berry, Chris; Shujuan, Zhang.

In: Journal of Chinese Cinemas, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Berry, C & Shujuan, Z 2019, 'Film and fashion in Shanghai: What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution', Journal of Chinese Cinemas. https://doi.org/10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895

APA

Berry, C., & Shujuan, Z. (2019). Film and fashion in Shanghai: What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution. Journal of Chinese Cinemas. https://doi.org/10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895

Vancouver

Berry C, Shujuan Z. Film and fashion in Shanghai: What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution. Journal of Chinese Cinemas. 2019. https://doi.org/10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895

Author

Berry, Chris ; Shujuan, Zhang. / Film and fashion in Shanghai : What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution. In: Journal of Chinese Cinemas. 2019.

Bibtex Download

@article{defcf4800e4c4a32a62407a4fbe46fce,
title = "Film and fashion in Shanghai: What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution",
abstract = "Recent scholarship has challenged the assumption that China was an ocean of drab sartorial uniformity during the Cultural Revolution decade. This essay extends this tendency by asking what role cinema played in people's choices about what to wear. Based on data gathered in group interviews in Shanghai, it finds several tendencies: revolutionary history films inspired contemporary military-style clothing, but not only for political reasons; foreign films screened during the Cultural Revolution built up a mental archive of contemporary international fashion that was drawn upon as the strictures of the era were relaxed in the 1970s; and memories of films screened before 1966 provided another mental archive of retro-fashion possibilities, also drawn on as strictures were relaxed. Overall, our research demonstrates that even though socio-political frameworks always condition individual agency, even in the most difficult of times, individual agency continues to be exercised in the interstices of everyday life.",
author = "Chris Berry and Zhang Shujuan",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Chinese Cinemas",
issn = "1750-8061",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Film and fashion in Shanghai

T2 - What (not) to wear during the cultural revolution

AU - Berry, Chris

AU - Shujuan, Zhang

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Recent scholarship has challenged the assumption that China was an ocean of drab sartorial uniformity during the Cultural Revolution decade. This essay extends this tendency by asking what role cinema played in people's choices about what to wear. Based on data gathered in group interviews in Shanghai, it finds several tendencies: revolutionary history films inspired contemporary military-style clothing, but not only for political reasons; foreign films screened during the Cultural Revolution built up a mental archive of contemporary international fashion that was drawn upon as the strictures of the era were relaxed in the 1970s; and memories of films screened before 1966 provided another mental archive of retro-fashion possibilities, also drawn on as strictures were relaxed. Overall, our research demonstrates that even though socio-political frameworks always condition individual agency, even in the most difficult of times, individual agency continues to be exercised in the interstices of everyday life.

AB - Recent scholarship has challenged the assumption that China was an ocean of drab sartorial uniformity during the Cultural Revolution decade. This essay extends this tendency by asking what role cinema played in people's choices about what to wear. Based on data gathered in group interviews in Shanghai, it finds several tendencies: revolutionary history films inspired contemporary military-style clothing, but not only for political reasons; foreign films screened during the Cultural Revolution built up a mental archive of contemporary international fashion that was drawn upon as the strictures of the era were relaxed in the 1970s; and memories of films screened before 1966 provided another mental archive of retro-fashion possibilities, also drawn on as strictures were relaxed. Overall, our research demonstrates that even though socio-political frameworks always condition individual agency, even in the most difficult of times, individual agency continues to be exercised in the interstices of everyday life.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064170331&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895

DO - 10.1080/17508061.2017.1422895

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85064170331

JO - Journal of Chinese Cinemas

JF - Journal of Chinese Cinemas

SN - 1750-8061

ER -

View graph of relations

© 2020 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454