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First responder communication in CBRN environments: FIRCOM-CBRN Study

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First responder communication in CBRN environments : FIRCOM-CBRN Study . / Schumacher, Jan; Arlidge, James; Dudley, Declan; Van Ross, Jennifer; Garnham, Francesca; Prior, Kate.

In: EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol. 36, No. 8, 29.07.2019, p. 456-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Schumacher, J, Arlidge, J, Dudley, D, Van Ross, J, Garnham, F & Prior, K 2019, 'First responder communication in CBRN environments: FIRCOM-CBRN Study ', EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, vol. 36, no. 8, pp. 456-458. https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-208413

APA

Schumacher, J., Arlidge, J., Dudley, D., Van Ross, J., Garnham, F., & Prior, K. (2019). First responder communication in CBRN environments: FIRCOM-CBRN Study . EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, 36(8), 456-458. https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-208413

Vancouver

Schumacher J, Arlidge J, Dudley D, Van Ross J, Garnham F, Prior K. First responder communication in CBRN environments: FIRCOM-CBRN Study . EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL. 2019 Jul 29;36(8):456-458. https://doi.org/10.1136/emermed-2019-208413

Author

Schumacher, Jan ; Arlidge, James ; Dudley, Declan ; Van Ross, Jennifer ; Garnham, Francesca ; Prior, Kate. / First responder communication in CBRN environments : FIRCOM-CBRN Study . In: EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL. 2019 ; Vol. 36, No. 8. pp. 456-458.

Bibtex Download

@article{526ca3995f1f43389739090db3b784d3,
title = "First responder communication in CBRN environments: FIRCOM-CBRN Study ",
abstract = "Introduction: Recent terror attacks and assassinations involving highly toxic chemical weapons have stressed the importance of sufficient respiratory protection of medical first responders and receivers. As full-face respirators cause perceptual-motor impairment, they not only impair vision but also significantly reduce speech intelligibility. The recent introduction of electronic voice projection units (VPUs), attached to a respirator, may improve communication while wearing personal respiratory protection. Objective: To determine the influence of currently used respirators and VPUs on medical communication and speech intelligibility. Methods: 37 trauma anaesthetists carried out an evaluation exercise of six different respirators and VPUs including one control. Participants had to listen to audio clips of a variety of sentences dealing with scenarios of emergency triage and medical history taking. Results: In the questionnaire, operators stated that speech intelligibility of the Avon C50 respirator scored the highest (mean 3.9, ±SD 1.0) and that the Respirex Powered Respiratory Protective Suit (PRPS) NHS-suit scored lowest (1.6, 0.9). Regarding loudness the C50 plus the Avon VPU scored highest (4.1, 0.7), followed by the Draeger FPS-7000-com-plus (3.4, 1.0) and the Respirex PRPS NHS-suit scored lowest (2.3, 0.8). Conclusions: We found that the Avon C50 is the preferred model among the tested respirators. In our model, electronic voice projection modules improved loudness but not speech intelligibility. The Respirex PRPS NHS-suit was rated significantly less favourably in respect of medical communication and speech intelligibility.",
keywords = "CbRn, communications, resuscitation",
author = "Jan Schumacher and James Arlidge and Declan Dudley and {Van Ross}, Jennifer and Francesca Garnham and Kate Prior",
year = "2019",
month = jul,
day = "29",
doi = "10.1136/emermed-2019-208413",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "456--458",
journal = "EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL",
issn = "1472-0205",
number = "8",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - First responder communication in CBRN environments

T2 - FIRCOM-CBRN Study

AU - Schumacher, Jan

AU - Arlidge, James

AU - Dudley, Declan

AU - Van Ross, Jennifer

AU - Garnham, Francesca

AU - Prior, Kate

PY - 2019/7/29

Y1 - 2019/7/29

N2 - Introduction: Recent terror attacks and assassinations involving highly toxic chemical weapons have stressed the importance of sufficient respiratory protection of medical first responders and receivers. As full-face respirators cause perceptual-motor impairment, they not only impair vision but also significantly reduce speech intelligibility. The recent introduction of electronic voice projection units (VPUs), attached to a respirator, may improve communication while wearing personal respiratory protection. Objective: To determine the influence of currently used respirators and VPUs on medical communication and speech intelligibility. Methods: 37 trauma anaesthetists carried out an evaluation exercise of six different respirators and VPUs including one control. Participants had to listen to audio clips of a variety of sentences dealing with scenarios of emergency triage and medical history taking. Results: In the questionnaire, operators stated that speech intelligibility of the Avon C50 respirator scored the highest (mean 3.9, ±SD 1.0) and that the Respirex Powered Respiratory Protective Suit (PRPS) NHS-suit scored lowest (1.6, 0.9). Regarding loudness the C50 plus the Avon VPU scored highest (4.1, 0.7), followed by the Draeger FPS-7000-com-plus (3.4, 1.0) and the Respirex PRPS NHS-suit scored lowest (2.3, 0.8). Conclusions: We found that the Avon C50 is the preferred model among the tested respirators. In our model, electronic voice projection modules improved loudness but not speech intelligibility. The Respirex PRPS NHS-suit was rated significantly less favourably in respect of medical communication and speech intelligibility.

AB - Introduction: Recent terror attacks and assassinations involving highly toxic chemical weapons have stressed the importance of sufficient respiratory protection of medical first responders and receivers. As full-face respirators cause perceptual-motor impairment, they not only impair vision but also significantly reduce speech intelligibility. The recent introduction of electronic voice projection units (VPUs), attached to a respirator, may improve communication while wearing personal respiratory protection. Objective: To determine the influence of currently used respirators and VPUs on medical communication and speech intelligibility. Methods: 37 trauma anaesthetists carried out an evaluation exercise of six different respirators and VPUs including one control. Participants had to listen to audio clips of a variety of sentences dealing with scenarios of emergency triage and medical history taking. Results: In the questionnaire, operators stated that speech intelligibility of the Avon C50 respirator scored the highest (mean 3.9, ±SD 1.0) and that the Respirex Powered Respiratory Protective Suit (PRPS) NHS-suit scored lowest (1.6, 0.9). Regarding loudness the C50 plus the Avon VPU scored highest (4.1, 0.7), followed by the Draeger FPS-7000-com-plus (3.4, 1.0) and the Respirex PRPS NHS-suit scored lowest (2.3, 0.8). Conclusions: We found that the Avon C50 is the preferred model among the tested respirators. In our model, electronic voice projection modules improved loudness but not speech intelligibility. The Respirex PRPS NHS-suit was rated significantly less favourably in respect of medical communication and speech intelligibility.

KW - CbRn

KW - communications

KW - resuscitation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067515287&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/emermed-2019-208413

DO - 10.1136/emermed-2019-208413

M3 - Article

VL - 36

SP - 456

EP - 458

JO - EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL

JF - EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL

SN - 1472-0205

IS - 8

ER -

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