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From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy

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From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy. / Duvic-Paoli, Leslie-Anne.

In: Melbourne Journal of International Law, Vol. 22, No. 1, 30.03.2021.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Duvic-Paoli, L-A 2021, 'From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy', Melbourne Journal of International Law, vol. 22, no. 1.

APA

Duvic-Paoli, L-A. (Accepted/In press). From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy. Melbourne Journal of International Law, 22(1).

Vancouver

Duvic-Paoli L-A. From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy. Melbourne Journal of International Law. 2021 Mar 30;22(1).

Author

Duvic-Paoli, Leslie-Anne. / From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy. In: Melbourne Journal of International Law. 2021 ; Vol. 22, No. 1.

Bibtex Download

@article{d4922526d5fd423e9c6da8ef9f0f63be,
title = "From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy",
abstract = "This article examines the international legal impacts of Sustainable Development Goal ({\textquoteleft}SDG{\textquoteright}) 7 on {\textquoteleft}access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all{\textquoteright} five years after its adoption. The inclusion of a stand-alone goal on energy in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has been hailed as a historic shift away from the reluctance of states to govern energy issues at a global level. At the same time, the ability of SDG 7 to strengthen the role played by international law in the field of energy appears limited because it is a deeply political commitment. This article argues that SDG 7 has so far remained an aspirational goal and proposes a taxonomy of normative effects that, if fulfilled, could qualify the Goal as a soft law instrument. First, it presents the SDGs as political aspirations that entertain ambiguous relationships with international law: as a result, their normative status does not bring much clarity about the role played by SDG 7 in the international legal system. Second, it focuses on the origins and crystallisation of the aspirational goal to understand the place of SDG 7 within existing multilateral efforts to govern the energy sector cooperatively. Third, it maps the impacts of SDG 7 on institutional, treaty and customary law to argue that while these remain at present minimal, SDG 7 could in the future behave like a soft law tool.",
author = "Leslie-Anne Duvic-Paoli",
year = "2021",
month = mar,
day = "30",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "Melbourne Journal of International Law",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - From Aspirational Politics to Soft Law? Exploring the International Legal Effects of Sustainable Development Goal 7 on Affordable and Clean Energy

AU - Duvic-Paoli, Leslie-Anne

PY - 2021/3/30

Y1 - 2021/3/30

N2 - This article examines the international legal impacts of Sustainable Development Goal (‘SDG’) 7 on ‘access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all’ five years after its adoption. The inclusion of a stand-alone goal on energy in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has been hailed as a historic shift away from the reluctance of states to govern energy issues at a global level. At the same time, the ability of SDG 7 to strengthen the role played by international law in the field of energy appears limited because it is a deeply political commitment. This article argues that SDG 7 has so far remained an aspirational goal and proposes a taxonomy of normative effects that, if fulfilled, could qualify the Goal as a soft law instrument. First, it presents the SDGs as political aspirations that entertain ambiguous relationships with international law: as a result, their normative status does not bring much clarity about the role played by SDG 7 in the international legal system. Second, it focuses on the origins and crystallisation of the aspirational goal to understand the place of SDG 7 within existing multilateral efforts to govern the energy sector cooperatively. Third, it maps the impacts of SDG 7 on institutional, treaty and customary law to argue that while these remain at present minimal, SDG 7 could in the future behave like a soft law tool.

AB - This article examines the international legal impacts of Sustainable Development Goal (‘SDG’) 7 on ‘access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all’ five years after its adoption. The inclusion of a stand-alone goal on energy in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has been hailed as a historic shift away from the reluctance of states to govern energy issues at a global level. At the same time, the ability of SDG 7 to strengthen the role played by international law in the field of energy appears limited because it is a deeply political commitment. This article argues that SDG 7 has so far remained an aspirational goal and proposes a taxonomy of normative effects that, if fulfilled, could qualify the Goal as a soft law instrument. First, it presents the SDGs as political aspirations that entertain ambiguous relationships with international law: as a result, their normative status does not bring much clarity about the role played by SDG 7 in the international legal system. Second, it focuses on the origins and crystallisation of the aspirational goal to understand the place of SDG 7 within existing multilateral efforts to govern the energy sector cooperatively. Third, it maps the impacts of SDG 7 on institutional, treaty and customary law to argue that while these remain at present minimal, SDG 7 could in the future behave like a soft law tool.

M3 - Article

VL - 22

JO - Melbourne Journal of International Law

JF - Melbourne Journal of International Law

IS - 1

ER -

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