King's College London

Research portal

From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression: evolution of a psychopathological construct

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Standard

From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression : evolution of a psychopathological construct. / Ventriglio, Antonio; Bhugra, Dinesh; Sampogna, Gaia; Luciano, Mario; De Berardis, Domenico; Sani, Gabriele; Fiorillo, Andrea.

In: International Review of Psychiatry, Vol. 32, No. 5-6, 17.08.2020, p. 471-476.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Harvard

Ventriglio, A, Bhugra, D, Sampogna, G, Luciano, M, De Berardis, D, Sani, G & Fiorillo, A 2020, 'From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression: evolution of a psychopathological construct', International Review of Psychiatry, vol. 32, no. 5-6, pp. 471-476. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517

APA

Ventriglio, A., Bhugra, D., Sampogna, G., Luciano, M., De Berardis, D., Sani, G., & Fiorillo, A. (2020). From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression: evolution of a psychopathological construct. International Review of Psychiatry, 32(5-6), 471-476. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517

Vancouver

Ventriglio A, Bhugra D, Sampogna G, Luciano M, De Berardis D, Sani G et al. From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression: evolution of a psychopathological construct. International Review of Psychiatry. 2020 Aug 17;32(5-6):471-476. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517

Author

Ventriglio, Antonio ; Bhugra, Dinesh ; Sampogna, Gaia ; Luciano, Mario ; De Berardis, Domenico ; Sani, Gabriele ; Fiorillo, Andrea. / From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression : evolution of a psychopathological construct. In: International Review of Psychiatry. 2020 ; Vol. 32, No. 5-6. pp. 471-476.

Bibtex Download

@article{aeb7a1f9d1d745c28efaae6479946da1,
title = "From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression: evolution of a psychopathological construct",
abstract = "Dysthymia is a psychopathological construct historically described and often reconsidered through the centuries. Its first description is dated back to 400 b.C., when Hippocrates proposed his theory about the {\textquoteleft}black bile{\textquoteright} and the melancholic temperament. The concept of dysthymia (dys-, {\textquoteleft}ill{\textquoteright}, thymia-, {\textquoteleft}emotions{\textquoteright}) has been largely elaborated in the XIX and XX centuries by Burton, Cullen, Schneider, Kretschmer, Akiskal and other authors, and recently re-formulated in the various editions of the modern Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders under different diagnostic labels: neurotic depression, dysthymic disorder, persistent depressive disorder. Beyond the nosology, dysthymia issues some other challenges, including the need for further research to characterise the peculiar pathophysiological framework of this syndrome (compared with major depressive disorder) and to better define evidences about tailored-treatment options and their effectiveness.",
keywords = "Dysthymia, dysthymic disorder, persistent depressive disorder, treatment- resistant depression",
author = "Antonio Ventriglio and Dinesh Bhugra and Gaia Sampogna and Mario Luciano and {De Berardis}, Domenico and Gabriele Sani and Andrea Fiorillo",
year = "2020",
month = aug,
day = "17",
doi = "10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "471--476",
journal = "International Review of Psychiatry",
issn = "0954-0261",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "5-6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - From dysthymia to treatment-resistant depression

T2 - evolution of a psychopathological construct

AU - Ventriglio, Antonio

AU - Bhugra, Dinesh

AU - Sampogna, Gaia

AU - Luciano, Mario

AU - De Berardis, Domenico

AU - Sani, Gabriele

AU - Fiorillo, Andrea

PY - 2020/8/17

Y1 - 2020/8/17

N2 - Dysthymia is a psychopathological construct historically described and often reconsidered through the centuries. Its first description is dated back to 400 b.C., when Hippocrates proposed his theory about the ‘black bile’ and the melancholic temperament. The concept of dysthymia (dys-, ‘ill’, thymia-, ‘emotions’) has been largely elaborated in the XIX and XX centuries by Burton, Cullen, Schneider, Kretschmer, Akiskal and other authors, and recently re-formulated in the various editions of the modern Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders under different diagnostic labels: neurotic depression, dysthymic disorder, persistent depressive disorder. Beyond the nosology, dysthymia issues some other challenges, including the need for further research to characterise the peculiar pathophysiological framework of this syndrome (compared with major depressive disorder) and to better define evidences about tailored-treatment options and their effectiveness.

AB - Dysthymia is a psychopathological construct historically described and often reconsidered through the centuries. Its first description is dated back to 400 b.C., when Hippocrates proposed his theory about the ‘black bile’ and the melancholic temperament. The concept of dysthymia (dys-, ‘ill’, thymia-, ‘emotions’) has been largely elaborated in the XIX and XX centuries by Burton, Cullen, Schneider, Kretschmer, Akiskal and other authors, and recently re-formulated in the various editions of the modern Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders under different diagnostic labels: neurotic depression, dysthymic disorder, persistent depressive disorder. Beyond the nosology, dysthymia issues some other challenges, including the need for further research to characterise the peculiar pathophysiological framework of this syndrome (compared with major depressive disorder) and to better define evidences about tailored-treatment options and their effectiveness.

KW - Dysthymia

KW - dysthymic disorder

KW - persistent depressive disorder

KW - treatment- resistant depression

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85085505196&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517

DO - 10.1080/09540261.2020.1765517

M3 - Review article

C2 - 32436408

AN - SCOPUS:85085505196

VL - 32

SP - 471

EP - 476

JO - International Review of Psychiatry

JF - International Review of Psychiatry

SN - 0954-0261

IS - 5-6

ER -

View graph of relations

© 2018 King's College London | Strand | London WC2R 2LS | England | United Kingdom | Tel +44 (0)20 7836 5454