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From Erewhon to AlphaGo: For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines?

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From Erewhon to AlphaGo : For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines? / Brownsword, Roger.

In: Law, Innovation and Technology, Vol. 9, No. 1, 2017, p. 117-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Harvard

Brownsword, R 2017, 'From Erewhon to AlphaGo: For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines?', Law, Innovation and Technology, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 117-153. https://doi.org/10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927

APA

Brownsword, R. (2017). From Erewhon to AlphaGo: For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines? Law, Innovation and Technology, 9(1), 117-153. https://doi.org/10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927

Vancouver

Brownsword R. From Erewhon to AlphaGo: For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines? Law, Innovation and Technology. 2017;9(1):117-153. https://doi.org/10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927

Author

Brownsword, Roger. / From Erewhon to AlphaGo : For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines?. In: Law, Innovation and Technology. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 1. pp. 117-153.

Bibtex Download

@article{8cb1713568cf47d5be9802ad765ca351,
title = "From Erewhon to AlphaGo: For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines?",
abstract = "This paper asks whether, for the sake of human dignity, regulators should adopt a precautionary approach to the development of smart machines. Having identified a set of essential (or commons{\textquoteright}) conditions for the existence of human social agents, including respect for human dignity in both foundational and non-foundational senses, consideration is given to human reliance on personal digital assistants, to the development of autonomous vehicles and lethal autonomous weapons systems, and to the use of smart machines in the criminal justice system. The paper concludes that, while smart machines should not be destroyed, a degree of precaution for the sake of human dignity is warranted. In particular, it is recommended that international agencies should monitor the impact of smart machines on the commons{\textquoteright} conditions; and that national commissions should facilitate the articulation of the local social licence for the development and application of such machines.",
keywords = "Autonomous vehicles, Autonomous weapons, Criminal justice, Human dignity, Machine learning, Personal digital systems, Precaution, Smart machines",
author = "Roger Brownsword",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "117--153",
journal = "Law, Innovation and Technology",
issn = "1757-997X",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - From Erewhon to AlphaGo

T2 - For the sake of human dignity, should we destroy the machines?

AU - Brownsword, Roger

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - This paper asks whether, for the sake of human dignity, regulators should adopt a precautionary approach to the development of smart machines. Having identified a set of essential (or commons’) conditions for the existence of human social agents, including respect for human dignity in both foundational and non-foundational senses, consideration is given to human reliance on personal digital assistants, to the development of autonomous vehicles and lethal autonomous weapons systems, and to the use of smart machines in the criminal justice system. The paper concludes that, while smart machines should not be destroyed, a degree of precaution for the sake of human dignity is warranted. In particular, it is recommended that international agencies should monitor the impact of smart machines on the commons’ conditions; and that national commissions should facilitate the articulation of the local social licence for the development and application of such machines.

AB - This paper asks whether, for the sake of human dignity, regulators should adopt a precautionary approach to the development of smart machines. Having identified a set of essential (or commons’) conditions for the existence of human social agents, including respect for human dignity in both foundational and non-foundational senses, consideration is given to human reliance on personal digital assistants, to the development of autonomous vehicles and lethal autonomous weapons systems, and to the use of smart machines in the criminal justice system. The paper concludes that, while smart machines should not be destroyed, a degree of precaution for the sake of human dignity is warranted. In particular, it is recommended that international agencies should monitor the impact of smart machines on the commons’ conditions; and that national commissions should facilitate the articulation of the local social licence for the development and application of such machines.

KW - Autonomous vehicles

KW - Autonomous weapons

KW - Criminal justice

KW - Human dignity

KW - Machine learning

KW - Personal digital systems

KW - Precaution

KW - Smart machines

U2 - 10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927

DO - 10.1080/17579961.2017.1303927

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85026251458

VL - 9

SP - 117

EP - 153

JO - Law, Innovation and Technology

JF - Law, Innovation and Technology

SN - 1757-997X

IS - 1

ER -

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