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Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents

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Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents. / Bourque, Josiane; Spechler, Philip A.; Potvin, Stéphane; Whelan, Robert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Buechel, Christian; Quinlan, Erin Burke; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure; C. McEwen, Sarah; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise ; Smolka, Michael N.; Vetter, Nora C.; Walter, Henrik; Schumann, Gunter; Garavan, Hugh; Conrod, Patricia J.; Consortium, IMAGEN.

In: The American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 147, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 566-575.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Bourque, J, Spechler, PA, Potvin, S, Whelan, R, Banaschewski, T, Bokde, ALW, Bromberg, U, Buechel, C, Quinlan, EB, Desrivieres, S, Flor, H, Frouin, V, Gowland, P, Heinz, A, Ittermann, B, Martinot, J-L, Paillère-Martinot, M-L, C. McEwen, S, Nees, F, Orfanos, DP, Paus, T, Poustka, L, Smolka, MN, Vetter, NC, Walter, H, Schumann, G, Garavan, H, Conrod, PJ & Consortium, IMAGEN 2017, 'Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents', The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 147, no. 6, pp. 566-575. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897

APA

Bourque, J., Spechler, P. A., Potvin, S., Whelan, R., Banaschewski, T., Bokde, A. L. W., ... Consortium, IMAGEN. (2017). Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 147(6), 566-575. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897

Vancouver

Bourque J, Spechler PA, Potvin S, Whelan R, Banaschewski T, Bokde ALW et al. Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents. The American Journal of Psychiatry. 2017 Jun 1;147(6):566-575. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897

Author

Bourque, Josiane ; Spechler, Philip A. ; Potvin, Stéphane ; Whelan, Robert ; Banaschewski, Tobias ; Bokde, Arun L W ; Bromberg, Uli ; Buechel, Christian ; Quinlan, Erin Burke ; Desrivieres, Sylvane ; Flor, Herta ; Frouin, Vincent ; Gowland, Penny ; Heinz, Andreas ; Ittermann, Bernd ; Martinot, Jean-Luc ; Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure ; C. McEwen, Sarah ; Nees, Frauke ; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos ; Paus, Tomáš ; Poustka, Luise ; Smolka, Michael N. ; Vetter, Nora C. ; Walter, Henrik ; Schumann, Gunter ; Garavan, Hugh ; Conrod, Patricia J. ; Consortium, IMAGEN. / Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents. In: The American Journal of Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 147, No. 6. pp. 566-575.

Bibtex Download

@article{ff5737b24a0e4dbf80724a758385c315,
title = "Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents",
abstract = "Objective:This study investigated the neural correlates of psychotic-like experiences in youths during tasks involving inhibitory control, reward anticipation, and emotion processing. A secondary aim was to test whether these neurofunctional correlates of risk were predictive of psychotic symptoms 2 years later.Method:Functional imaging responses to three paradigms—the stop-signal, monetary incentive delay, and faces tasks—were collected in youths at age 14, as part of the IMAGEN study. At baseline, youths from London and Dublin sites were assessed on psychotic-like experiences, and those reporting significant experiences were compared with matched control subjects. Significant brain activity differences between the groups were used to predict, with cross-validation, the presence of psychotic symptoms in the context of mood fluctuation at age 16, assessed in the full sample. These prediction analyses were conducted with the London-Dublin subsample (N=246) and the full sample (N=1,196).Results:Relative to control subjects, youths reporting psychotic-like experiences showed increased hippocampus/amygdala activity during processing of neutral faces and reduced dorsolateral prefrontal activity during failed inhibition. The most prominent regional difference for classifying 16-year-olds with mood fluctuation and psychotic symptoms relative to the control groups (those with mood fluctuations but no psychotic symptoms and those with no mood symptoms) was hyperactivation of the hippocampus/amygdala, when controlling for baseline psychotic-like experiences and cannabis use.Conclusions:The results stress the importance of the limbic network’s increased response to neutral facial stimuli as a marker of the extended psychosis phenotype. These findings might help to guide early intervention strategies for at-risk youths.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Brain Imaging Techniques, Mood Disorders-Bipolar, Psychosis",
author = "Josiane Bourque and Spechler, {Philip A.} and St{\'e}phane Potvin and Robert Whelan and Tobias Banaschewski and Bokde, {Arun L W} and Uli Bromberg and Christian Buechel and Quinlan, {Erin Burke} and Sylvane Desrivieres and Herta Flor and Vincent Frouin and Penny Gowland and Andreas Heinz and Bernd Ittermann and Jean-Luc Martinot and Marie-Laure Paill{\`e}re-Martinot and {C. McEwen}, Sarah and Frauke Nees and Orfanos, {Dimitri Papadopoulos} and Tom{\'a}š Paus and Luise Poustka and Smolka, {Michael N.} and Vetter, {Nora C.} and Henrik Walter and Gunter Schumann and Hugh Garavan and Conrod, {Patricia J.} and IMAGEN Consortium",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
pages = "566--575",
journal = "The American Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0002-953X",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Publishing Inc.",
number = "6",

}

RIS (suitable for import to EndNote) Download

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional Neuroimaging Predictors of Self-Reported Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents

AU - Bourque, Josiane

AU - Spechler, Philip A.

AU - Potvin, Stéphane

AU - Whelan, Robert

AU - Banaschewski, Tobias

AU - Bokde, Arun L W

AU - Bromberg, Uli

AU - Buechel, Christian

AU - Quinlan, Erin Burke

AU - Desrivieres, Sylvane

AU - Flor, Herta

AU - Frouin, Vincent

AU - Gowland, Penny

AU - Heinz, Andreas

AU - Ittermann, Bernd

AU - Martinot, Jean-Luc

AU - Paillère-Martinot, Marie-Laure

AU - C. McEwen, Sarah

AU - Nees, Frauke

AU - Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos

AU - Paus, Tomáš

AU - Poustka, Luise

AU - Smolka, Michael N.

AU - Vetter, Nora C.

AU - Walter, Henrik

AU - Schumann, Gunter

AU - Garavan, Hugh

AU - Conrod, Patricia J.

AU - Consortium, IMAGEN

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Objective:This study investigated the neural correlates of psychotic-like experiences in youths during tasks involving inhibitory control, reward anticipation, and emotion processing. A secondary aim was to test whether these neurofunctional correlates of risk were predictive of psychotic symptoms 2 years later.Method:Functional imaging responses to three paradigms—the stop-signal, monetary incentive delay, and faces tasks—were collected in youths at age 14, as part of the IMAGEN study. At baseline, youths from London and Dublin sites were assessed on psychotic-like experiences, and those reporting significant experiences were compared with matched control subjects. Significant brain activity differences between the groups were used to predict, with cross-validation, the presence of psychotic symptoms in the context of mood fluctuation at age 16, assessed in the full sample. These prediction analyses were conducted with the London-Dublin subsample (N=246) and the full sample (N=1,196).Results:Relative to control subjects, youths reporting psychotic-like experiences showed increased hippocampus/amygdala activity during processing of neutral faces and reduced dorsolateral prefrontal activity during failed inhibition. The most prominent regional difference for classifying 16-year-olds with mood fluctuation and psychotic symptoms relative to the control groups (those with mood fluctuations but no psychotic symptoms and those with no mood symptoms) was hyperactivation of the hippocampus/amygdala, when controlling for baseline psychotic-like experiences and cannabis use.Conclusions:The results stress the importance of the limbic network’s increased response to neutral facial stimuli as a marker of the extended psychosis phenotype. These findings might help to guide early intervention strategies for at-risk youths.

AB - Objective:This study investigated the neural correlates of psychotic-like experiences in youths during tasks involving inhibitory control, reward anticipation, and emotion processing. A secondary aim was to test whether these neurofunctional correlates of risk were predictive of psychotic symptoms 2 years later.Method:Functional imaging responses to three paradigms—the stop-signal, monetary incentive delay, and faces tasks—were collected in youths at age 14, as part of the IMAGEN study. At baseline, youths from London and Dublin sites were assessed on psychotic-like experiences, and those reporting significant experiences were compared with matched control subjects. Significant brain activity differences between the groups were used to predict, with cross-validation, the presence of psychotic symptoms in the context of mood fluctuation at age 16, assessed in the full sample. These prediction analyses were conducted with the London-Dublin subsample (N=246) and the full sample (N=1,196).Results:Relative to control subjects, youths reporting psychotic-like experiences showed increased hippocampus/amygdala activity during processing of neutral faces and reduced dorsolateral prefrontal activity during failed inhibition. The most prominent regional difference for classifying 16-year-olds with mood fluctuation and psychotic symptoms relative to the control groups (those with mood fluctuations but no psychotic symptoms and those with no mood symptoms) was hyperactivation of the hippocampus/amygdala, when controlling for baseline psychotic-like experiences and cannabis use.Conclusions:The results stress the importance of the limbic network’s increased response to neutral facial stimuli as a marker of the extended psychosis phenotype. These findings might help to guide early intervention strategies for at-risk youths.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Brain Imaging Techniques

KW - Mood Disorders-Bipolar

KW - Psychosis

U2 - 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897

DO - 10.1176/appi.ajp.2017.16080897

M3 - Article

VL - 147

SP - 566

EP - 575

JO - The American Journal of Psychiatry

T2 - The American Journal of Psychiatry

JF - The American Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0002-953X

IS - 6

ER -

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