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Genetic specificity of face recognition

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12877-12892
Number of pages15
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Volume112
Issue number41
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Sep 2015

Documents

  • Shakeshaft_X_Plomin_PNAS_150715

    Shakeshaft_X_Plomin_PNAS_150715.docx, 41 KB, application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document

    12/01/2016

    Accepted author manuscript

    CC BY

King's Authors

Abstract

Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities.

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