Genome-Wide Polygenic Scores Predict Reading Performance Throughout the School Years

Saskia Selzam*, Philip S. Dale, Richard K. Wagner, John C. DeFries, Martin Cederlöf, Paul F. O’Reilly, Eva Krapohl, Robert Plomin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)
204 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

It is now possible to create individual-specific genetic scores, called genome-wide polygenic scores (GPS). We used a GPS for years of education (EduYears) to predict reading performance assessed at UK National Curriculum Key Stages 1 (age 7), 2 (age 12) and 3 (age 14) and on reading tests administered at ages 7 and 12 in a UK sample of 5,825 unrelated individuals. EduYears GPS accounts for up to 5% of the variance in reading performance at age 14. GPS predictions remained significant after accounting for general cognitive ability and family socioeconomic status. Reading performance of children in the lowest and highest 12.5% of the EduYears GPS distribution differed by a mean growth in reading ability of approximately two school years. It seems certain that polygenic scores will be used to predict strengths and weaknesses in education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalSCIENTIFIC STUDIES OF READING
Early online date28 Mar 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Mar 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Genome-Wide Polygenic Scores Predict Reading Performance Throughout the School Years'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this