Glass-ionomer and calcium silicate-based cements interactions with human dentine in health and disease: Two-photon fluorescence microscopy and Raman spectroscopy analysis.

Shara Sajini, Amre R. Atmeh*, Avijit Banerjee, Frederic Festy, Richard J. Cook, Manoharan Andiappan, Timothy F. Watson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate the potential mineralising effects of calcium silicate-based dentine replacement material (Biodentine™) in comparison with glass-ionomer cement (GIC) (Fuji IX™) on different human dentine substrates using a multimodal non-invasive optical assessment. Methods: Cements were applied on artificially demineralised or naturally carious dentine and stored for 4 weeks in phosphate-rich media +/- tetracycline used for mineralisation labelling. Interfacial dentine was examined from the same sample and location before and after aging using two-photon fluorescence microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging. Additionally, Raman spectroscopy was used to detect changes in the mineral content of dentine. Results: Significant changes in the fluorescence intensity and lifetime were detected in partially demineralised dentine and caries-affected dentine underneath both tested cements, after storage (p < 0.001). This was associated with a significant increase in the mineral content as indicated by the increased intensity of the phosphate Raman peak located at 959 cm−1 (p < 0.0001). Caries-infected dentine showed significant fluorescence changes under Biodentine™ after storage (p < 0.001), but not under GIC (p = 0.44). Tetracycline binding induced a reduction in the fluorescence lifetime with comparable increase in the fluorescence intensity in both cements’ groups within the affected dentine (p < 0.001). Significance Two-photon fluorescence microscopy can be used efficiently for non-destructive in-vitro dentine caries characterisation providing a technique for studying the same dentine-cement interface over time and detect changes. Biodentine™ demonstrated comparable remineralising potential to GIC, in addition to inducing remineralisation of caries-infected dentine. This may suggest using Biodentine™ as part of minimally invasive operative dentistry (MID) in caries management.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1710-1720
Number of pages11
JournalDental Materials
Volume38
Issue number11
Early online date14 Oct 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Calcium silicate
  • Caries
  • Caries-affected dentine
  • Cements
  • Dental caries
  • Glass ionomer
  • Multiphoton fluorescence microscopy
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • Remineralisation
  • Tetracycline

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