Governing the moral economy: Animal engineering, ethics and the liberal government of science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The preferred Western model for science governance has come to involve attending to the perspectives of the public. In practice, however, this model has been criticised for failing to promote democracy along participatory lines. We argue that contemporary approaches to science policy making demonstrate less the failure of democracy and more the success of liberal modes of government in adapting to meet new governance challenges. Using a case study of recent UK policy debates on scientific work mixing human and animal biological material, we show first how a 'moral economy' is brought into being as a regulatory domain and second how this domain is governed to align cultural with scientific values. We suggest that it is through these practices that the state assures its aspirations for enhancing individual and collective prosperity through technological advance are met.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-199
Number of pages7
JournalSocial science & medicine (1982)
Volume75
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Governing the moral economy: Animal engineering, ethics and the liberal government of science'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this