“Home sweet home, that’s where I come from, where I got my knowledge of the road and the flow from”: Grime music as an expression of identity in postcolonial London

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
1093 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper examines how grime music and the grime scene function as a vehicle for expressions of identity–individual, local, national, and transnational–for some young people growing up in the multicultural, postcolonial context of the UK capital in the twenty-first century. Grime is electronic music, often with rap-style vocals, which emerged from London around the turn of the millennium, and which offers insights into the experiences of a section of, predominantly black, working-class urban youth. The stories grime tells paint a vivid picture, not just of individual lives in particular communities, but also of the larger canvas of a global, multicultural city in perpetual transformation, and the resulting changes in cultural and socio-linguistic practices.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)438-455
Number of pages18
JournalPopular Music & Society
Volume42
Issue number4
Early online date28 May 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Aug 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '“Home sweet home, that’s where I come from, where I got my knowledge of the road and the flow from”: Grime music as an expression of identity in postcolonial London'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this