How we use molecular minimal residual disease (MRD) testing in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)

Richard Dillon, Nicola Potter, Sylvie Freeman, Nigel Russell*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In recent years there have been major advances in the use of molecular diagnostic and monitoring techniques for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). Coupled with the simultaneous explosion of new therapeutic agents, this has sown the seeds for significant improvements to treatment algorithms. Here we show, using a selection of real-life examples, how molecular monitoring can be used to refine clinical decision-making and to personalise treatment in patients with AML with nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutations, core binding factor translocations and other fusion genes. For each case we review the established evidence base and provide practical recommendations where evidence is lacking or conflicting. Finally, we review important technical considerations that clinicians should be aware of in order to safely exploit these technologies as they undergo widespread implementation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • AML
  • molecular MRD
  • NPM1 mutations

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