Human anergic CD4(+) T cells can act as suppressor cells by affecting autologous dendritic cell conditioning and survival

L Frasca, C Scotta, G Lombardi, E Piccolella

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    41 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    T cell suppression exerted by regulatory T cells represents a well-established phenomenon, but the mechanisms involved are still a matter of debate. Recent data suggest that anergic T cells can suppress responder T cell activation by inhibiting Ag presentation by dendritic cells (DC). In this study, we focused our attention on the mechanisms that regulate the susceptibility of DC to suppressive signals and analyzed the fate of DC and responder T cells. To address this issue, we have cocultured human allo-reactive or Ag-specific CD4(+) T cell clones, rendered anergic by incubation with immobilized anti-CD3 Ab, with autologous DC and responder T cells. We show that anergic T cells affect either Ag-presenting functions or survival of DC, depending whether immature or mature DC are used as APC. Indeed, MHC and costimulatory molecule expression on immature DC activated by responder T cells is inhibited, while apoptotic programs are induced in mature DC and in turn in responder T cells. Ligation of CD95 by CD95L expressed on anergic T cells in the absence of CD40-CD40L (CD154) interaction are critical parameters in eliciting apoptosis in both DC and responder T cells. In conclusion, these findings indicate that the defective activation of CD40 on DC by CD95L(+) CD154-defective anergic T cells could be the primary event in determining T cell suppression and support the role of CD40 signaling in regulating both conditioning and survival of DC
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1060 - 1068
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Immunology
    Volume168
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2002

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