Human Tissue Biobanks: Time for Research Ethics Committees to re-appraise the dichotomy between 'Personal Sovereignty' and 'The Common Good'

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Abstract

Biobanks are currently archiving human materials for medical research at a hitherto unprecedented rate. These valuable resources will be essential for developing personalized medicines and for a better understanding of disease susceptibilities. However, for such advances to benefit all, it is crucial that biobanks recruit donations from all sections of the community. Unfortunately, from our experience of other initiatives within the UK, such as transplant programs, there is a clear demonstration that ethnic minorities are under-represented. Here we suggest that this issue deserves serious consideration to avoid biobanks evolve into ethnically-biased archives which unwittingly promote race-specific research. Specifically, this necessitates Research Ethics Committees engaging in a re-assessment of the relative merits of individual personal sovereignty and the 'common good'.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe International Society of Biological and Environmental Repositories presents Abstracts from their Annual Meeting
Subtitle of host publicationKeeping Step in an Evolving Global Research Environment: Biobanking for Now and for the Future May 15–18, 2012 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Pages207-207
Number of pages1
Volume10 B&B
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 May 2012

Publication series

NameBIOPRESERVATION AND BIOBANKING
PublisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Number2
Volume10

Keywords

  • Biobank
  • ethnic minorities
  • Ethics, Medical

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