"I wanted to do more of the homework!"-Feasibility and acceptability of blending app-based homework with group therapy for social cognition in psychosis

Ottilie Sedgwick, Amy Hardy, Ben Greer, Katie Newbery, Matteo Cella*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Evidence suggests social-cognitive difficulties are linked to poor community functioning in people with psychosis, however, there is limited evidence that social-cognition interventions improve functioning. This may be due to poor generalization of therapy learning; digital technologies may be useful to support this. This study evaluates the feasibility of a brief, blended intervention (group therapy plus app) for individuals with psychosis.

METHODS: A total of 14 clients diagnosed with psychosis-spectrum difficulties participated. Feasibility was assessed by referral, adherence and completion rates, and acceptability via semi-structured interview (thematically analyzed).

RESULTS: The procedures were considered feasible and acceptable. The face-to-face component of the intervention was particularly valued, and participants reported benefits to their daily lives. The app was experienced as helpful, alongside some difficulties.

CONCLUSIONS: Development of blended interventions may prove an important avenue to maximize the adherence and reach of psychological interventions. The results of this study reinforce the need to maintain face-to-face components alongside digital.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2701-2724
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume77
Issue number12
Early online date8 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

Keywords

  • app
  • blended
  • group
  • psychosis
  • social cognition
  • technology
  • therapy

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '"I wanted to do more of the homework!"-Feasibility and acceptability of blending app-based homework with group therapy for social cognition in psychosis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this