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Identification of the research on warfare and health, 1946-2017

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference paper

Grant Lewison, Marian Abouzeid, Ammar Sabouni, Manal El Zalabany, Samer Jabbour, Richard Sullivan

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication17th International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, ISSI 2019 - Proceedings
EditorsGiuseppe Catalano, Cinzia Daraio, Martina Gregori, Henk F. Moed, Giancarlo Ruocco
PublisherInternational Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics
Pages271-282
Number of pages12
Volume1
ISBN (Electronic)9788833811185
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019
Event17th International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, ISSI 2019 - Rome, Italy
Duration: 2 Sep 20195 Sep 2019

Conference

Conference17th International Conference on Scientometrics and Informetrics, ISSI 2019
CountryItaly
CityRome
Period2/09/20195/09/2019

King's Authors

Abstract

In order to characterise the scope, thematic content and evolution of the field of literature on health and armed conflict, we undertook a preliminary study to identify the body of research undertaken since the Second World War. This involved the iterative development of a complex filter which was applied to the Web of Science. We included papers on the effects of war on both soldiers and on civilian populations, both in the combat zone and when displaced. In total, we found 10,467 papers, after manual removal of many irrelevant ones. The large majority came from the USA, but several countries were much more active in research on warfare and health than in biomedical research overall, notably the small countries that had suffered most from recent warfare. Because of the much-increased volume of biomedical research since year 2000, there were many papers in the last two decades, especially on mental disorders rather than physical wounds, and their effects on soldiers rather than civilians and refugees. Japanese papers were the most highly cited; many were on the effects of ionising radiation.

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