Image-guided thermosensitive liposomes for focused ultrasound enhanced co-delivery of carboplatin and SN-38 against triple negative breast cancer in mice

Paul Cressey, Maral Amrahli, Po Wah So, Wladyslaw Gedroyc, Michael Wright, Maya Thanou*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Triggerable nanocarriers have the potential to significantly improve the therapeutic index of existing anticancer agents. They allow for highly localised delivery and release of therapeutic cargos, reducing off-target toxicity and increasing anti-tumour activity. Liposomes may be engineered to respond to an externally applied stimulus such as focused ultrasound (FUS). Here, we report the first co-delivery of SN-38 (irinotecan's super-active metabolite) and carboplatin, using an MRI-visible thermosensitive liposome (iTSL). MR contrast enhancement was achieved by the incorporation of a gadolinium lipid conjugate in the liposome bilayer along with a dye-labelled lipid for near infrared fluorescence bioimaging. The resulting iTSL were successfully loaded with SN-38 in the lipid bilayer and carboplatin in the aqueous core - allowing co-delivery of both. The iTSL demonstrated both thermosensitivity and MR-imageability. In addition, they showed effective local targeted co-delivery of carboplatin and SN-38 after triggered release with brief FUS treatments. A single dosage induced significant improvement of anti-tumour activity (over either the free drugs or the iTSL without FUS-activation) in triple negative breast cancer xenografts tumours in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Article number120758
JournalBiomaterials
Volume271
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Carboplatin
  • iTSLs
  • MRI
  • SN-38
  • Thermosensitive liposomes
  • Triple negative breast cancer

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