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Imaging evolution of the primate brain: the next frontier?

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Patrick Friedrich, Stephanie J. Forkel, Céline Amiez, Joshua H. Balsters, Olivier Coulon, Lingzhong Fan, Alexandros Goulas, Fadila Hadj-Bouziane, Erin E. Hecht, Katja Heuer, Tianzi Jiang, Robert D. Latzman, Xiaojin Liu, Kep Kee Loh, Kaustubh R. Patil, Alizée Lopez-Persem, Emmanuel Procyk, Jerome Sallet, Roberto Toro, Sam Vickery & 8 more Susanne Weis, Charles  R   E Wilson, Ting Xu, Valerio Zerbi, Simon B. Eickoff, Daniel  S S. Margulies, Rogier  B B. Mars, Michel Thiebaut de Schotten

Original languageEnglish
Article number117685
JournalNeuroImage
Volume228
DOIs
PublishedMar 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information: This work was inspired by the #CompMRI meeting in Dusseldorf, Germany (April 11–12 2019), which was supported by the Human Brain Project. The work of RBM is supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council ( BBSRC ) UK [ BB/N019814/1 ] and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research NWO [ 452-13-015 ]. J.S. was supported by a Sir Henry Dale Wellcome Trust Fellowship ( 105651/Z/14/Z ) and IDEXLYON “IMPULSION 2020 grant ( IDEX/IMP/2020/14 ). The Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging is supported by core funding from the Wellcome Trust [ 203139/Z/16/Z ]. MTS has received funding from the European Research Council ( ERC ) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. 818521 ). EEH was supported by National Science Foundation awards IOS-1457291 and NCS-1631563 . Funding Information: This work was inspired by the #CompMRI meeting in Dusseldorf, Germany (April 11?12 2019), which was supported by the Human Brain Project. The work of RBM is supported by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) UK [BB/N019814/1] and the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research NWO [452-13-015]. J.S. was supported by a Sir Henry Dale Wellcome Trust Fellowship (105651/Z/14/Z) and IDEXLYON ?IMPULSION 2020 grant (IDEX/IMP/2020/14). The Wellcome Centre for Integrative Neuroimaging is supported by core funding from the Wellcome Trust [203139/Z/16/Z]. MTS has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No. 818521). EEH was supported by National Science Foundation awards IOS-1457291 and NCS-1631563. All the authors wrote and revised the manuscript. N/A Publisher Copyright: © 2020 Copyright: Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

King's Authors

Abstract

Evolution, as we currently understand it, strikes a delicate balance between animals' ancestral history and adaptations to their current niche. Similarities between species are generally considered inherited from a common ancestor whereas observed differences are considered as more recent evolution. Hence comparing species can provide insights into the evolutionary history. Comparative neuroimaging has recently emerged as a novel subdiscipline, which uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to identify similarities and differences in brain structure and function across species. Whereas invasive histological and molecular techniques are superior in spatial resolution, they are laborious, post-mortem, and oftentimes limited to specific species. Neuroimaging, by comparison, has the advantages of being applicable across species and allows for fast, whole-brain, repeatable, and multi-modal measurements of the structure and function in living brains and post-mortem tissue. In this review, we summarise the current state of the art in comparative anatomy and function of the brain and gather together the main scientific questions to be explored in the future of the fascinating new field of brain evolution derived from comparative neuroimaging.

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