Impact of patient involvement in mental health research: longitudinal study

Liam Ennis*, Til Wykes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

187 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background

It is deemed good practice to involve patients routinely in research but no study has investigated the practical benefits, particularly to successful recruitment.

Aims

To identify whether patient involvement is associated with study success.

Method

All studies listed on the Mental Health Research Network (MHRN) portfolio database (n=374) were interrogated using logistic regression, ANOVA and Pearson's correlation to identify associations with study characteristics, funding bodies and recruitment success.

Results

Patient involvement increased over time although in some areas of research it was limited. Some funders, especially the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), had more associated patient involvement than others. Studies that involved patients to a greater extent were more likely to have achieved recruitment targets (chi(2)=4.58, P<0.005), defined as reaching at least 90% of the target.

Conclusions

This is the first time associations with study success have been identified for patient involvement. Researchers might now consider ways to involve patients more comprehensively as this is associated with study success. Further research is needed to explore this finding.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberN/A
Pages (from-to)381-386
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Psychiatry
Volume203
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Keywords

  • SERVICE USERS
  • OUTCOME MEASURES
  • PERCEPTIONS
  • CARE

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