Implementing a training intervention to support caregivers after stroke: a process evaluation examining the initiation and embedding of programme change

David James Clarke, Mary Godfrey, Rebecca Hawkins, Euan Sadler, Geoffrey Harding, Anne Forster, Christopher McKevitt, Josie Dickerson, Amanda Farrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Citations (Scopus)
145 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance identifies implementation as a key element of the development and evaluation process for complex healthcare interventions. Implementation is itself a complex process involving the mobilization of human, material, and organizational resources to change practice within settings that have pre-existing structures, historical patterns of relationships, and routinized ways of working. Process evaluations enable researchers and clinicians to understand how implementation proceeds and what factors impact on intended program change. A qualitative process evaluation of the pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial; Training Caregivers after Stroke was conducted to examine how professionals were engaged in the work of delivering training; how they reached and involved caregivers for whom the intervention was most appropriate; how did those on whom training was targeted experience and respond to it. Normalization Process Theory, which focuses attention on implementing and embedding program change, was used as a sensitizing framework to examine selected findings.
Original languageEnglish
Article number96
Number of pages15
JournalImplementation Science
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Aug 2013

Keywords

  • Acknowledges NIHR

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Implementing a training intervention to support caregivers after stroke: a process evaluation examining the initiation and embedding of programme change'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this